Posts Tagged ‘getting high’

Do People Smoke More Marijuana In The Summer?

I have been involved in the marijuana industry for a long, long time.  I can’t speak for all areas, or all circles, but in Oregon, there is one fact that I believe above all others in the marijuana industry – people smoke more recreational marijuana in the summer than in any other part of the year.  Feel free to disagree with me, but all Oregon veterans will tell you that their most profitable months have always been during the summer.  I believe there are a few reasons (and admittedly, no statistics) to support my claim.

During the summer months, there is so much more going on. Festivals seem to be abundant. I know I have been to almost a dozen of them so far, from the Spring Gathering in San Bernadino to the Oregon Country Fair just outside of Eugene. Every event, I made sure to have as many blunts, joints, bowls and brownies as I could, and I’m sure I wasn’t alone. I don’t know what it is about sitting on some grass listening to music with a bunch of other stoners that gets me going, but it does.

Another big event that goes on a lot during the summer that results in A LOT of marijuana consumption is camping. If you are a pothead, and you go camping, you make sure to pack a smoking device and marijuana way before you think about a tent or anything else. If I had to chose, I would sleep under the stars with a full pipe way before I would pass it up for a tent.

Another factor is that school is out, so there are a lot more people working that weren’t. I had so many classmates in high school and college that had to scrum together money for an eighth once every never during the academic year. But when they got their first paycheck from their summer job, they were smoking like a broken chimney.

Does anyone else feel the same out there in TWB land? Do you consume more marijuana during the summer, or another part of the year? Are things different in your area than what I’m talking about in Oregon? Curious minds await your responses….

 

- http://www.theweedblog.com

Videos of the Day: Medical Marijuana Dispensary Tips

Check out these videos to learn tips on how to deal with medical marijuana.

Check these guys out:

http://www.youtube.com/user/mmjbootcamp

Their videos are SUPER informative for all of your medical marijuana needs!
Enjoy!

Snoop Dogg & Wiz Khalifa starring in Stoner Movie “High School”

Wiz Khalifa and Snoop Dogg Starring in Stoner Movie “High School”

This is an interview of Wiz Khalifa from Rolling Stone Magazine. Khalifa is going to be starring in a new Stoner Movie with Snoop Dogg, and the two have also put together a soundtrack packed with collaborations.Wiz Khalifa says the movie is about having fun, getting high and enlightening their audience by “laying some game” on them.

I don’t think I need to say how awesome this movie is going to be, but I will. Wiz Khalifa is the new king of stoner entertainers, and Snoop Dogg is the one passing him the crown. The two together is the stuff of cannabis entertainment legend. Ever since Kid Cudi gave up pot, there’s been a whole in my heart, this movie and soundtrack just about fills it up.
First seen by Baked Life on stoner blog Rhaine or Shine.

 

Check out the Wiz Khalifa interview right here: http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/blogs/rolling-stone-video-blog/video-wiz-khalifa-talks-about-his-high-school-movie-with-snoop-dogg-20110322

In this interview shot backstage at SXSW, rapper Wiz Khalifa talks to Rolling Stone about High School, the stoner comedy he’s making with Snoop Dogg, and the movie’s soundtrack, which will be a full-album collaboration between the two rappers. “It’s about pot, of course,” the rapper says. “But it’s also a spin-off of us being cool in the industry, and smoking a lot of weed.”

Best Ways To Cure Cottonmouth

This is a Guest Post from our friends over at Weed Maps.

Xerostomia. Wtf? Don’t panic. We’re not going to go all Greek on you. Xerostomia (zero-STOW-me-uh) is the fancyass medical word for cottonmouth. Also known as hyposalivation, cottonmouth is what happens when you’ve blazed a bongload and suddenly your mouth is so dry you can hardly speak. Your lips stick to your teeth, and it becomes about impossible to swallow. Sure, it can be funny when it happens to someone else. When your own mouth is so dry you can’t stand it, it’s not such a good time.

What causes cottonmouth?

There are several things that can cause your mouth to feel as dry as a desert. Certain medications can make your mouth dry. Not drinking enough water during the day can also lead to a wickedly un-wet mouth. But, for the purposes of this blog, we will assume that your cottonmouth is caused by smoking cannabis. This certainly is the most fun way to dry out your lips, tongue and mouth.

Can cottonmouth be prevented?

Probably not. For whatever scientific reasons, smoking weed often dries the mucus membranes of the human mouth. Smoking dank, delicious bud may also cause your salivary glands to produce less spit. So, if you’re gonna get baked there’s an excellent chance you’re also gonna get cottonmouth. One thing you can do to prevent the horrors of cottonmouth is to be sure you drink plenty of water whenever you’re awake. It’s better to sip a little bit of water several times an hour than it is to chug a gallon all at once. Sugary drinks like Kool-Aid and Coke may actually make your cottonmouth worse. Besides, those kind of beverages are not good for you anyway. If you really need to swill something sweet, go for fruit juice, unsweetened iced tea or honey-sweetened lemonade. Yeah, we know that honey is for hippies, but it’s still a whole lot better for you than plain sugar. The point is to get lots of water-based fluids into your system.

Can cottonmouth be cured?

Not permanently. Remember what we told you twelve seconds ago about avoiding sugar? Well, you can forget it now. Sucking on hard candies such as Lifesavers or Jolly Ranchers will increase your saliva production and keep your mouth nice and moist. If we were your Mom, we’d advise you to brush your teeth after macking on candy. But we’re not your mother, so we won’t. In fact, we’re going to give you a list of candies that are excellent temporary cottonmouth cures:

* Lifesavers

* Jolly Ranchers (watermelon is best)

* Smarties

* Sweet Tarts

* Willy Wonka Bottlecaps

* Willy Wonka Nerds

* Colombina Sour Balls

* Blow Pops

* Lemonheads

* Jawbreakers

* Red Vines

Candies like chocolate will probably not fix your cottonmouth. What you’re looking for is a candy that takes a lot of time to suck on. So, next time you go to meet your guy or visit your local dispensary, be sure to stop somewhere and lay in a good supply of slow-melting sweets. You might as well go ahead and get enough to share with your friends because you know how they are. When you get home, twist a fatty or load up your vape and don’t space out where you left your bag of delicious, cottonmouth-curing candy.

Information About Cooking With Marijuana

Cooking with Marijuana

Most weed-related recipes call for the making of a certain quantity of “Marijuana Butter” or “Bud Butter”, which is then used as a replacement for standard butter in a cooking situation. To prepare pot for eating it has to be heated in some way. It won’t work if the weed is eaten without preparation, because the digestive system is unable to digest THC directly. When cooking with weed, it is very important to use fat (oil, butter, milk) because THC (the stuff that gets you stoned) is fat soluble and not water soluble. It is therefore impossible to get high from pot tea, for example, without adding some milk. Learn how to make bud butter

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How to make Bud Butter

Cooking with weed offers an alternative to inhaling marijuana smoke to get high. By using “Bud Butter” in your recipes you can consume the marijuana in a tasty way.

Here’s one recipe for Bud Butter:

Ingredients
1 lb. of butter (not margarine!)
1/2 ounce of finely ground marijuana

Method
Melt the butter in a sauce pan until it’s simmering.
Add the marijuana and let simmer for 30 minutes or so until the butter has turned green from the marijuana.
Pour butter through a strainer to remove all the pieces of marijuana.
Chill until solid.

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Methods of THC extraction

- butter
- cooking oil (soak in for a week)
- milk
- cream
- flour – Another method that doesn’t require cooking is cannaflour. Grind the cannabis up as fine as you can get it, and mix it with the following ratio: for every cup of flour, mix in a half cup of powdered cannabis. Your final product is cannaflour, and you can use it in just about every baking recipe.
- weed – If you’re in a hurry you can also do the following: melt some (dairy) butter in a pan and throw in some weed; stir a bit, and then fry an egg (or a pancake or whatever) in it. Don’t throw the weed away, it will still contain some THC. Eat the egg or whatever you made. Sweet stuff (honey, syrup, marmalade) tastes good with weed.

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What are the effects?

It can take anywhere from 20 minutes to even up to 4-5 hours for the effects to set in. The biggest problem here is to find the right amount. When smoked, the effects set in almost immediately, so it is easy to judge how much you need. After eating some weed, some users are too impatient, and they think they need more. While it is not possible to overdose on weed, the effects of eating too much cannabis are not pleasant. You may feel sick, confused, unable to move or talk, and your coordination may be heavily affected. These effects may last a long time, much longer than when smoked. It is therefore important not to eat too much. Start with a low dose, and increase it the next time, if needed. Experiment to find the right amount. If you eat too much, a high dose of vitamin c (200mg or more) may help to make you feel better.

When eaten, pot takes longer to work, depending on: the amount and quality of the weed/hash, the rate of your digestion system, and the amount of food you’ve eaten beforehand. For best results, we recommend not eating anything at least 2-3 hours before eating your marijuana.

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How much weed do I use?

Since weed is not an “officially regulated” product it’s hard to recommend an amount to use as the strength of the weed will vary greatly. Many people prefer to use “cabbage,” or the leafy, low quality type of weed, in their cooking. Buds are usually reserved for smoking, but of course you’re free to cook buds, but any cooking disasters will be a lot more expensive!

Trial and error is your guide here. If you’re making bud butter, you might go through a few saucepans full of cabbage before the butter is green and smelly enough to be useful for cooking. It’s a good idea to note down how much you’ve used so you know for next time.

California Legislation Would Stop Cops From Policing For Profit

marijuana and Cash

The hearing for Assembly Bill 639 to reform asset forfeiture in California
has fortunately been rescheduled to Tuesday, July 5th. This bill, while not perfect, is an attempt to prevent California law enforcement authorities from using federal authority to perform asset forfeitures. Cutting off this loophole is important; the federal Equitable Sharing program allows state and local law enforcement to ignore state law about the process and disposition of forfeitures. Most dangerously, Equitable Sharing allows state and local law enforcement to directly retain forfeiture proceeds (in other words, policing for profit).

This bill should be particularly important for Drug War reformers; much of Drug War enforcement is paid for by federal forfeiture dollars that get spent by state and local police on military equipment, drug task salaries and bonuses, and the organization infrastructure that allows the existence of the Drug War. California state and local law enforcement now receive upwards of $70 million a year through Equitable Sharing forfeiture dollars alone.

I am working with Christina Walsh of the Institute for Justice to solicit
testimony from forfeiture victims to submit to the California Senate Public
Safety Committee on Tuesday, July 5th. Please contact me if you are
interested in submitting testimony (we can help you draft such testimony).

You can reach me at Eapen@ForfeitureReform.com.

Many thanks

Eapen Thampy
Executive Director, Americans for Forfeiture Reform
3630 Holmes St., Kansas City, MO, 64109
Phone: 573-673-5351
Email: Eapen@ForfeitureReform.com or Eapen.Thampy@gmail.com
Web: http://www.forfeiturereform.com and

http://www.facebook.com/ForfeitureReform

Pot Drivers: Stoned Driving Is Uncharted Territory

Drug test

Officers look for signs of drug impairment. Without a standard in most states for the amount of pot allowable in a driver’s system, police administer a lengthy 12-point examination.
(Joe McHugh, CHP / July 3, 2011)

By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times

July 2, 2011, 3:46 p.m.

It was his green tongue that helped give away Jimmy Candido Flores when police arrived at the fatal accident scene near Chico.

Flores had run off the road and killed a jogger, Carrie Jean Holliman, a 56-year-old Chico elementary school teacher. California Highway Patrol officers thought he might be impaired and conducted a sobriety examination. Flores’ tongue had a green coat typical of heavy marijuana users and a later test showed he had pot, as well as other drugs, in his blood.

After pleading guilty to manslaughter, Flores, a medical marijuana user, was sentenced in February to 10 years and 8 months in prison.

Holliman’s death and others like it across the nation hint at what experts say is an unrecognized crisis: stoned drivers.

The most recent assessment by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, based on random roadside checks, found that 16.3% of all drivers nationwide at night were on various legal and illegal impairing drugs, half them high on marijuana.

In California alone, nearly 1,000 deaths and injuries each year are blamed directly on drugged drivers, according to CHP data, and law enforcement puts much of the blame on the rapid growth of medical marijuana use in the last decade. Fatalities in crashes where drugs were the primary cause and alcohol was not involved jumped 55% over the 10 years ending in 2009.

“Marijuana is a significant and important contributing factor in a growing number of fatal accidents,” said Gil Kerlikowske, director of National Drug Control Policy in the White House and former Seattle police chief. “There is no question, not only from the data but from what I have heard in my career as a law enforcement officer.”

As the medical marijuana movement has gained speed — one-third of the states now allow such sales — federal officials are pursuing scientific research into the impairing effects of the drug.

The issue is compounded by the lack of a national standard on the amount of the drug that drivers should be allowed to have in their blood. While 13 states have adopted zero-tolerance laws, 35 states including California have no formal standard, and instead rely on the judgment of police to determine impairment.

Even the most cautious approach of zero tolerance is fraught with complex medical issues about whether residual low levels of marijuana can impair a driver days after the drug is smoked. Marijuana advocates say some state and federal officials are trying to make it impossible for individuals to use marijuana and drive legally for days or weeks afterward.

Marijuana is not nearly as well understood as alcohol, which has been the subject of statistical and medical research for decades.

“A lot of effort has gone into the study of drugged driving and marijuana, because that is the most prevalent drug, but we are not nearly to the point where we are with alcohol,” said Jeffrey P. Michael, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s impaired-driving director. “We don’t know what level of marijuana impairs a driver.”

A $6-million study in Virginia Beach, Va., is attempting to remove any doubt that users of pot and other drugs are more likely to crash. Teams of federal researchers go to accident scenes and ask drivers to voluntarily provide samples of their blood. They later return to the same location, at the same time and on the same day of the week, asking two random motorists not involved in crashes for a blood sample.

The project aims to collect 7,500 blood samples to show whether drivers with specific blood levels of drugs are more likely to crash than those without the drugs, said John Lacey, a researcher at the nonprofit Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation.

In other projects, test subjects are being given marijuana to smoke and then examined under high-powered scanners or put in advanced driving simulators to gauge how it affects their brains and their ability to drive.

Federal scientists envision a day when police could quickly swab saliva from drivers’ mouths and determine whether they have an illegal level of marijuana, but that will require years of research. Until then, police are in the same position they were with drunk driving in the 1950s, basing arrests on their professional judgment of each driver’s behavior and vital signs.

If police suspect a driver is stoned, they now administer a lengthy 12-point examination. The driver must walk a straight line and stand on one leg, estimate the passage of 30 seconds and have pupils, blood pressure and pulse checked.

Chuck Hayes, national coordinator for the International Assn. of Chiefs of Police based in Washington, D.C., says the system works well to identify impaired drivers, and any future legal limit or medical test would be just another tool rather than a revolutionary change.

“We are not concerned about levels or limits. We are concerned with impairment,” Hayes said.

Indeed, even among law enforcement experts, the need for a standard is debated. Many support tried-and-true policing methods that can ferret out stoned drivers.

“Everybody wants a magic number, because that makes it easy,” said Sarah Kerrigan, a toxicologist at Sam Houston State University in Texas and an expert witness in numerous trials. “To have a law that says above a certain level you are impaired is not scientifically supportable. I don’t think police need the tool, but my opinion may be in the minority.”

But federal officials and local prosecutors argue that the lack of a standard makes convictions harder to obtain.

In October, a San Diego jury acquitted Terry Barraclough, a 60-year-old technical writer and medical marijuana user, on manslaughter charges in a fatal crash that occurred shortly after he had smoked marijuana.

A blood test showed he had high levels of active marijuana ingredients in his blood, but the jury heard conflicting expert testimony from toxicologists about the possible effects.

Martin Doyle, the deputy district attorney who prosecuted Barraclough, said the acquittal showed that the lack of a formal legal limit on marijuana intoxication makes such prosecutions tough.

“We don’t have a limit in California and that made my prosecution very difficult,” Doyle said. “We have a lapse in the law.”

But defense attorney Michael Cindrich said the failed prosecution shows that the San Diego district attorney was targeting medical marijuana users and that any legal limit would be unfair to the people who rely on the drug to treat their problems.

Indeed, Anthony Cardoza, an attorney who represented Flores in the Chico accident, said his client was not impaired and that allegations about his green tongue were ridiculous. Flores’ guilty plea was prompted by other legal issues, including a prior conviction for a drunk driving accident that caused an injury.

Marilyn Huestis, a toxicologist and one of the nation’s top experts on marijuana at the National Institute on Drug Abuse who is directing several research programs, said she believed there is no amount of marijuana that a person can consume and drive safely immediately afterward.

Supporters of marijuana legalization agree that the drug can impair a driver, but argue that the effects wear off in a few hours. Huestis, however, said research was showing that the effects of marijuana can linger.

Marijuana’s main ingredient — delta-9 THC — stays in the blood for an hour or more and then breaks down into metabolites that are both psychoactive and inert. But the impairing effects can linger, even after the THC is no longer in the blood, Huestis said. Because it can be absorbed into body tissue and slowly released for days, Huestis believes that heavy chronic daily users may be impaired in ways that are not yet understood.

A complicating factor is the tendency of many marijuana users to also use alcohol, which can sharply amplify impairment. Very little research has been conducted to determine whether it is possible to set limits on a combination of such substances.

Paul Armentano, deputy director for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, said some states had laws that can punish users even when they are not high, pointing to a tough Arizona statute that allows conviction for impaired driving when an inert metabolite is detected in the blood.

Arizona officials said they wrote the law because there was no scientific agreement on how long marijuana impairs a driver. But proponents see something more sinister: an effort to put marijuana users in constant legal jeopardy.

“We are not setting a standard based on impairment, but one similar to saying that if you have one sip of alcohol you are too drunk to drive for the next week,” Armentano said.

ralph.vartabedian@latimes.com

You can read more on this article here: http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-pot-drivers-20110703,0,3288424.story?page=2&utm_medium=feed&track=rss&utm_campaign=Feed%3A%20MostEmailed%20%28L.A.%20Times%20-%20Most%20E-mailed%20Stories%29&utm_source=feedburner

The Inventor of Fake Pot Wants You To Stop Smoking Fake Pot

Synthetic marijuana is interesting because of who would choose to use it. Yes, marijuana is illegal, especially on the recreational front, but weed dealers abound, and it’s easily the most common drug you’ll find just about everywhere. College dorm room, city street corner, random dude’s apartment, NYC mother’s medicine cabinet, the list could go on and on because there is such a ubiquitous nature to the drug, so what’s with this synthetic stuff?

What’s the allure? I get the allure of other drugs, but why would you want a synthetic compound nature grows so fabulously on it’s own? Why am I posing this question to imaginary readers, and why am I now posing a question to myself about asking imaginary readers (aside from the usual drivel about egomaniacal behavior); it’s because the inventor of synthetic marijuana DOES NOT WANT YOU TO SMOKE IT. READ ON to find out why (if my lede and your common sense didn’t answer the question for you already).

He’s now Professor Emeritus at South Carolina, but John Huffman is the inventor of the fake cannabis you see on the market today. As an organic chemist at Auburn University, Professor Huffman invented the appetite stimulant known as JWH 018–which mimics the effects of THC. The JWH -018 compound he invented was used to make the cannabinoids like Kronic you could enjoy as synthetic marijuana (until the DEA banned it).

The use of his work did not surprise him at all, “He said he was ‘not the least bit surprised’ that the compound had been adapted to make cannabinoids, such as Kronic, which was widely available throughout New Zealand and Australia.” That doesn’t mean he’s not concerned with its use, and he did not equivocate when asked whether people should indulge in the cannabinoid knock-offs that have sprung up in the wake of his discovery:

“Stop.”

“It can lead to serious psychological problems… It’s not known if they are irreversible.”

Imitation-cannabis products, largely manufactured in China, were marketed in the US as Spice or K2, and producers “wouldn’t listen as long as they are making money”, he said.

However, Professor Huffman stopped short of recommending NZ ban or even reclassify the product.

“It’s probably useless. Marijuana has been illegal in the United States since 1937.”

Well, it’s illegal unless the new bill gets passed, but Professor Hoffman isn’t the only one who warns against the synthetic alternatives.

One person supporting a ban is Dr Leo Schep, a toxicologist with the Dunedin-based National Poisons Centre, who said people should take heed of Professor Huffman’s warnings over the effects of synthetic cannabis.

“He would know this product better than anyone else in the world.

“If he said don’t use it, I would respect that opinion.”

There is a lot of tasty nugget out there which isn’t a cheap knock-off that may or may not be legal or good for you. Marijuana is from the earth, and the only side-effects after centuries of testing is munchies and giggling (there are others–but this is a pro marijuana blog and I don’t have the time to get into them). Stick with real herb, and leave the synthetic crap to idiots that are too scared or stupid to find the real thing. It’s just not worth it.

San Diego District Attorney Continues Anti-Marijuana Crusade

Bonnie Dumanis

By Terrie Best, San Diego Americans for Safe Access

Monday, June 27, 2011 in San Diego Superior Court, the faulty search warrant obtained by a misleading affidavit was upheld in the medical cannabis case of Jason and Sarine Gastrich.

All morning, Deputy DA Ramin Tohidi and attorneys for the defense argued the legitimacy of the warrant which led to felony charges of possession of marijuana for sale, cultivation, and child endangerment (due to the mere presence of marijuana plants in the house).

The mistruths and omissions utilized by law enforcement in the affidavit to convince Judge Whitney to sign the original warrant were evident to everyone in the courtroom; worrisome is they were not evident to the Judge who should have been outraged at what defense arguments labeled as a ‘judicial duping’ by Steve Reed and other law enforcement personnel.

Another issue raised during Monday’s hearing was whether law enforcement had enough probable cause to obtain the search warrant in the first place.

Instead of relying on probable cause, in this case as is typical with most medical cannabis cases in San Diego, law enforcement took advantage of a neighbor’s complaint of cannabis smell as reason enough to invade and destroy the Gastrich residence.

Taking the pieces of the investigation which supported evidence of marijuana and withholding the pieces of evidence which supported that the marijuana was medical and therefore lawful, the cross-sworn officers took their investigation to a California state court in a state were medical cannabis is lawful, and obtained a search warrant based solely on the premise that marijuana was smelled and that marijuana is illegal.

When will patients’ rights be respected by law enforcement? If judges will grant law enforcement the right to break down doors with guns draw simply because of the existence of marijuana in the home, we are all vulnerable to being abused, arrested, and drug through court for exercising our right to choose a medicine that helps us and is lawful by a ballot vote of the people.

In the hearing which lasted just under ten hours over two days, law enforcement investigators vehemently defended their warrant while the defense attempted to tease out just how much evidence pointing to medical cannabis had been kept from the judge and exactly why it was that the Gastrich family caught the attention of the cross jurisdiction Narcotics Task Force, or Team 9 of Operation Green Dope.

san diego asa

Apparently, it all began with a neighbor who became curious and then complained about a greenhouse structure in the Gastrich backyard, specifically a plywood barrier atop the fence between the two yards.

In a letter – which during the hearing caused somewhat of a Perry Mason moment after being whipped out of the lead case agent’s purse and entered into evidence never having been examined even by the prosecution – Gastrich explained the barrier was erected to protect his medical cannabis from the neighboring spot light.

This letter, addressed by Gastrich to neighbor Steve Skinner was subsequently sent to investigators in a series of moves that began with Skinner’s phone call to San Diego City Councilmember Kevin Faulconer a result of which the Narcotics Task Force launched their investigation.

The investigation was fraught with surveillance, K-9 units and a multitude of tactics to determine if marijuana was growing even though the Gastrich letter spoke of the medical cannabis grow and this was a fact neither of the defendants ever hid from.

What was missing from the investigation was even the slightest attempt to substantiate the couple’s garden as a legitimate medical cannabis garden.

Investigators wasted scarce resources to find probable cause for a fact the defendants would have freely admitted but they utterly failed to investigate if the Gastrichs were patients and further, carefully omitted any indication this might be so when they asked a judge if they could violate the 4th Amendment Rights of these citizens.

Special Agent Michelle Sarubbi of the U.S. Forestry lead the eight person swat-style raid including cross-sworn officers Matt Stevens, Steve Reed and a host of other Team Nine members sworn to protect California law but donning DEA hats when it suits them.

The judge was misled and these investigators wasted valuable resources and failed to protect the people or uphold the law.

This is more of the same from San Diego District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis, her fierce fight against patients and her dedication to overturning state law.

For more information on medical cannabis in San Diego, please visit our website at http://www.SafeAccessSD.org

Further Information:

Operation Green Dope; Bonnie Dumanis’ Medical Marijuana Eradication Effort Takes on New Name – http://www.safeaccesssd.org/2011/06/operation-green-dope-bonnie-dumanis.html

Fight Anti Medical Marijuana Legislation in California

Marijuana & Fist

TODAY we need your help to fight two alarming bills before the California state legislature that jeopardize collectives and dispensaries from being able to stay open and operate. These bills, SB847 and AB1300 affect all of California’s cities and counties, further restricting zoning and allowing those cities and counties to ban safe access entirely.  The votes on these bills are coming up quick. Time is of the essence and we need your help TODAY!

Right now we are asking that you call one or more of the Assembly members on the list below and utilizing the script below ask them to support an amendment to SB 847 that would exclude small collectives from the requirements of this bill.

We also ask that you email this information to your contact lists, social media accounts and reach out to other patients and caregivers – We ALL need to contact our Assembly Members today. Using the script below, call one or more Assembly members from the list below. When your call is answered, simply read the script (feel free to embellish it in any you wish) and thank them for providing your information to the Assembly member. Then call another assembly member on the list until you have called as many as you can.

Will you contact your Assembly members on this bill TODAY?

Thank you again so much for your time. If you have any questions you can contact Lanny at 760-799-2055 for more information. Please help pass this information along!

Here’s the script:

Hello, My name is ____________________ and I am calling ____(name of Assembly member)________ about SB 847 that will make illegal the small collectives patients form to cultivate at someone’s home. This will force patients to obtain their medicinal marijuana from illegal sources. Would you please ask ________(name of assemblymember)________ to add and support an amendment to SB 847 saying that this bill does not apply to small collectives with 10 or fewer members. Thank you.

Assembly members to call:

Cameron Smyth – Chair

Rep-38 (Santa Clarita)

(916) 319-2038

Assemblymember.Smyth@assembly.ca.gov

Luis A. Alejo – Vice Chair

Dem-28 (Salinas)

(916) 319-2028

Assemblymember.Alejo@assembly.ca.gov

Steven Bradford

Dem-51 (Inglewood)

(916) 319-2051

Assemblymember.Bradford@assembly.ca.gov

Nora Campos

Dem-23 (San Jose)

(916) 319-2023

Assemblymember.Campos@assembly.ca.gov

Mike Davis

Dem-48 (East LA)

(916) 319-2048

Assemblymember.Davis@assembly.ca.gov

Richard S. Gordon

Dem-21 (Los Altos)

(916) 319-2021

Assemblymember.Gordon@assembly.ca.gov

Ben Hueso

Dem-79 (Chula Vista)

(916) 319-2079

Assemblymember.Hueso@assembly.ca.gov

– Courtney Sheats
Community Liaison, Sacramento

Americans for Safe Access
Courtney@SafeAccessNow.org

C: (916) 588.8672
O: (510) 251.1856 x322

http://AmericansForSafeAccess.org

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