Posts Tagged ‘growing cannabis’

California Judge Rules Medical Marijuana Not An Agricultural Product

marijuana CaliforniaBy Steve Elliott of Toke of the Town

Yes, marijuana is a plant you grow from the ground. No, it’s not an agricultural crop. Confused yet?

In what is believed to be the first ruling of its kind in the state, a judge in California has ruled that a marijuana collective can’t operate on land zoned for agriculture, reports Lewis Griswold of the Fresno Bee.

In his ruling last week, Tulare County Superior Court Judge Paul Vortmann dismissed a property owner’s argument that a medical marijuana collective’s cultivation of marijuana is legal because it is in an agricultural zone.

“In this state, marijuana has never been classified as a crop or horticultural product,” Judge Vortmann wrote in his ruling. Marijuana is a controlled substance, the judge said.

“The court finds as a matter of law that growing marijuana … is not an agricultural use of property,” the judge wrote.

It’s the first time a court has addressed whether medical marijuana might be an agricultural crop, according to Tulare County Counsel Kathleen Bales-Lange, whose office sued a property owner and collective on behalf of the Board of Supervisors.

Marijuana plants are “agricultural in nature” because they grow like any other crop, according to lawyer Brandon Ormonde of Tulare, who represented the property owner. He acknowledged that medical marijuana has never been legally acknowledged as an “agricultural plant.”

“If it’s not a crop, I don’t know what it is,” said Dale Gieringer, director of California NORML, reports the Associated Press.

The case involved the Foothill Growers Association medical marijuana collective, which rented a building south of Ivanhoe in an agricultural zone. The collective grew plants inside the building and operated a dispensary.

Tulare County sued the collective and the property owner last year, arguing that marijuana dispensaries are only allowed in specified commercial and manufacturing zones.

Hash PlantThe group has until Friday to stop using the building. Hanford attorney Bill Romaine, who represents Foothill Growers Association, said on Thursday that he believed the cooperative had negotiated a new site to use in unincorporated Tulare County, reports David Castellon at the Visalia Times-Delta.

Five years ago, an estimate that marijuana was the top cash crop in the United States at $35.8 billion a year made headlines nationwide. The crop’s value is more than corn and wheat combined, according to legalization advocate Jon Gettman, who prepared the 2006 report.

But never mind all that. Marijuana is not recognized by the California Department of Food and Agriculture as an “agricultural commodity.” (Maybe it’s time they catch up to reality.)

No agricultural commissioner in the state — not even in Mendocino and Humboldt counties — lists cannabis in is annual crop reports.

“We don’t regulate or track marijuana at all and regard that as a law enforcement issue,” said Steve Lyle, speaking for the state agriculture agency.

That could all change, though, under a proposed ballot initiative that plans a farming future for marijuana. Among other things, it proposes to apply “existing agricultural taxes and regulations to marijuana” and would prohibit zoning restrictions on cannabis cultivation.

It was recently approved by the Secretary of State’s office for signature gathering in an attempt to get it on the 2012 ballot.

Article From Toke of the Town and republished with special permission.

Pot Grows, Yet California Judge Rules It Isn’t A Crop

And the stupidity continues with stupid decisions like this going on. Who knew a plant wasn’t a plant apparently?
It grows in the ground, requires sunshine and water to blossom and earns California growers an estimated $17 billion a year. But don’t call marijuana an agricultural crop in Tulare County.
The Fresno Bee (http://bit.ly/pwDIGg) reports that a judge ruled this week against a medical marijuana-growing collective that wanted to operate on land zoned for agriculture.
Tulare County Counsel Kathleen Bales-Lange says it’s the first time that courts have addressed whether marijuana can be classified as an agricultural crop. California voters legalized pot for medicinal purposes in 1996.
The case began when the county Board of Supervisors sued the Foothill Growers Association, which operated in an agriculture-zoned building.
In a ruling finalized Tuesday, Judge Paul Vortmann said the act of growing a controlled substance is not an agricultural use of property.
(Source) http://www.mercurynews.com

Teen Turns In Father On Marijuana Growing Operation

When you can even trust your own kids, who can you trust?
MURFREESBORO, Tenn. – A Murfreesboro father is in trouble after his own son turned him in for growing marijuana.
Police went to the family home after the 15-year-old called to report allegations of physical abuse. When officers arrived the teen handed them a marijuana plant growing in a small flower pot.  Inside the home, police found several plants in two illegal grow operations and arrested the father.
“The juvenile went inside and came out with a marijuana plant that was part of a grow operation inside the house,” said Kyle Evans with Murfreesboro Police.
In an exclusive interview the teen’s father told NewsChannel 5: “I could not believe my son would turn against his father like that.”
In addition to the marijuana plants and grow lights, Murfreesboro police also confiscated scales and supply of processed marijuana from the home. There’s no indication the suspect was growing the marijuana to sell.

Marijuana Growers’ Kids In Better Health According To Canadian Study

Canada grow roomBy Steve Elliott of Toke of the Town

A new study from Canada flies in the face of stereotypes regarding the offspring of marijuana-growing parents. Children from homes where cannabis is grown were healthy and drug-free, according to the study — in fact, healthier than other children — leading to questions about why such kids are often removed from their homes.

The research from the Motherisk Program at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children indicates the automatic removal of kids from marijuana-growing parents can be worse for the children than allowing them to stay at home, according to Gideon Koren, a University of Toronto professor and the program’s director, reports CBC News.

“After examining 75 of the kids over several years, we came to very clear conclusions that a vast majority of these kids are doing well,” Koren said. “Well fed, well kept, doing well in school and developing well.”

“In fact, the health problems found in this population were actually fewer than those in the general Canadian population,” according to a news release from the Hospital for Sick Children.

Children often enjoyed the lifestyle benefits of having high-income parents — even though that income is made illegally — and taking them away often “does a lot of damage,” Koren said.

“Taking a small child from his or her parents in a well-adapted environment causes fear, anxiety, confusion and sadness — everything that comes from separation,” he said.

When children are found in homes identified as marijuana-growing operations, they are usually removed, separating them from their parents and often placing them into foster care.

The Hospital for Sick Children examined 75 kids between 2006 and 2010 from Ontario’s York Region, just north of Toronto.

canada marijuanaSince 2006, child-welfare workers have learned more about the effects marijuana grow-ops have on children and have changed how they maintain the children’s safety, according to Patrick Lake, executive director of the York Region Children’s Aid Society.

“We have developed a more customize and comprehensive process to determine best response, on a case-by-case basis, while looking for ways to safely maintain children with their parents or relatives,” Lake said.

This was the first study done on the topic, and the findings mean authorities will now see these children differently, according to Koren.

“When police and children’s aid go into that situation, they have to look much more carefully on what happened to that child, and now blanket-wise moving kids out of their homes,” he said.

Article From Toke of the Town and republished with special permission.

California Releases Confiscated Marijuana Plant Statistics

I received this very interesting e-mail from CA NORML, and I thought others might be interested to see it:

California’s CAMP marijuana eradication reported 4,320,314 plant seizures in 2010, slightly less than last year’s all-time record of 4,463,917.

CAMP estimates the wholesale value of the destroyed crop at $17.2 billion – enough to qualify for agricultural disaster aid for any other crop.  This works out to $4,000 per plant, or over 1 lb per plant.   At this rate, the total amount of marijuana destroyed by CAMP works out to over four times the estimated consumption of the entire state of California (1 million lb/year).  CAMP’s harvest has soared tenfold since 2002-3.

The leading counties this year were Mendocino (572,680), Tuolumne (411,004), Lake (374,958), Shasta (325,480), Tehama (312,574, Sonoma (311,147), Tulare (227,002), San Bernardino (171,258), Riverside (155,209) and Humboldt (140,911).

- Cal NORML Release, Oct 30, 2010

Thank you calnorml & theweedblog.com for this!

The Male Plant with Jorge Cervantes

This week we’re going to check in with Jorge Cervantes; world-renowned expert on indoor, outdoor, and greenhouse cannabis cultivation. Jorge has over 30 years of expert cannabis growing knowledge and hands-on experience. He is also the author of several books and DVDs including the infamous Marijuana Horticulture: Indoor/Outdoor Medical Grower’s Bible. Jorge shows us the male cannabis plant dispersing pollen up close in this video. If you grow from seed or are curious about male plants and breeding, this video should be of particular interest to you. Check it out!

http://www.hailmaryjane.com

Miracle-Gro Makes A Play For The Medical Marijuana Market

Miracle-Gro seems to have finally gotten hip to the fact that lots of people use its chemical fertilizer to grow marijuana — and that with a little marketing, that number could get a lot, well, higher.

In an unusual move for the head of such a large company, Scotts Miracle-Gro Company CEO Jim Hagedorn said he is “exploring” targeting medical marijuana cultivators to boost sales at his lawn and garden supply firm, reports Dana Mattioli at The Wall Street Journal.
“I want to target the pot market,” Hagedorn said in an interview. “There’s no good reason we haven’t.”
Sales at Scott’s aren’t exactly suffering. In fact, they rose five percent last year, to $2.9 billion. But the company, based in Marysville, Ohio, relies on sales at three mega-retailers — Home Depot, Lowe’s, and Wal-Mart — for almost two-thirds of its revenue. But with those big-box retailers not building new stores as quickly as they used to, it appears the CEO wants to “diversify.”

hagedorn flip image 1226311x.jpg
Photo: cnet.tv
Scotts Miracle-Gro CEO Jim Hagedorn:
“I want to target the pot market. There’s no good reason we haven’t.”
Hagedorn is pushing is regional sales presidents to look for smaller pockets of growth — such as, you guessed it, the marijuana market — that together could produce a noticeable boost in sales.
Sixteen states have legalized medical marijuana, and the market will reach $1.7 billion in sales this year, according to a report by See Change Strategy LLC, an information data services company.
While that report focuses on revenue from growers and dispensaries, the market for companies selling ancillary supplies such as hydroponic equipment and nutrients is also thriving, according to Kris Lotlikar, president of See Change.
“We see very good growth for these types of companies as the medical marijuana business grows,” Lotlikar said.
Screen shot 2011-06-14 at 8.53.45 AM.png
Photo: Lowe’s
From preventing weeds to growing them?
​ While Hagedorn’s upfront desire to enter the medical marijuana market may still be a little unusual for a major CEO, he has never been a typical sort of chief executive. A former F-16 fighter pilot, Hagedorn flies his personal Cessna to and from meetings in Port Washington, New York, where he grew up, and the company’s headquarters in Ohio, “much to the chagrin of his board,” the Journal reports.
He also has a propensity for swear words and military references, and reportedly showed up at the office at least one day this month in jeans and sneakers.
Hagedorn took over Miracle-Gro from his father, who co-founded the company. According to the Journal, he would likely buy niche companies that already exist, rather than trying to create Miracle-Gro’s own line of branded marijuana nutrient products.
The transition into a marijuana-friendly company could have some interesting and awkward moments, given the fact that many of Miracle-Gro’s products, such as “Shake ‘n Feed” are designed to prevent “weeds,” rather than nurture them.
Raids on marijuana growing operations have already turned up Miracle-Gro products. Hagedorn said he takes that as a good sign of brand awareness, but he fears some growers could be reluctant to use such a “mainstream” product — and something tells me he’s about to find out how strong the “organic” movement continues to be in cannabis cultivation.
Yes, lots of medical marijuana patients much prefer organically grown weed — and who can blame them? When I use my medicine, I want to taste plants, not chemicals.

Jury Convicts 70-Year-Old Woman For Medical Marijuana

Barb Agro defendant doc4dee6aa4b9e82141413668.jpg
Photo: Oakland County Daily Tribune
Barb Agro, 70, was barred from mentioning during the trial that
she is a registered, legal medical marijuana patient.
A 70-year-old woman was convicted on a marijuana charge by a Michigan jury after they were instructed by the assistant prosecutor to “follow the law and not use sympathy” when weighing her fate.
“You must hold the defendant accountable for her actions,” said Assistant Prosecutor Beth Hand during her closing argument.

In the end, the jury heeded the prosecutor’s advice and decided to convict Barbara Agro, a registered medical marijuana patient and caregiver, as charged, reports Ann Zaniewski at the Oakland County Daily Tribune. Agro faces sentencing on July 13 for one count of delivery/manufacture of marijuana, a felony which can get four years in prison.

oakland circuit judge wendy potts flip doc4dd079caa7cd8116504841.jpg
Photo: The Oakland Press
Circuit Judge Wendy Potts ponders one of her “head up the ass” style rulings
The former Lake Orion police dispatcher worked as a receptionist at Clinical Relief, a medical marijuana dispensary in Ferndale. When the place was raided on August 25, 2010, Agro told deputies that she had marijuana plants growing at her house. Deputies found 19 cannabis plants and “other items” during a serch of her Lake Orion home.
Defense attorney Jerome Sabbota said Agro used cannabis for medicinal reasons.
“In this case here, we have a person who was growing medicine for herself,” Sabbota said.
Sabbota pointed to old laws, such as those surrounding prohibition and a law that once made it a crime to harbor a runaway slave. In his opening statement yesterday, he told jurors that laws sometimes need to be changed.
Assistant Prosecutor Hand said that Sabbota did not contest any elements of the charged crime. She said that marijuana, in the state of Michigan, is still illegal, and said Agro is not charged with using marijuana, but with growing it.
“This is not a medical marijuana case,” the assistant prosecutor claimed.
Hand referenced Agro’s age and told jurors that all different types of people break the law.
“The law is, that sympathy and prejudice have no place in the courtroom,” Hand said.
Oakland Circuit Judge Wendy Potts, who evidently issues rulings with her head up her ass, previously granted a motion from prosecutors seeking to prohibit Agro from mentioning the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act during the trial.

Indoor vs. Outdoor Marijuana Horticulture

If you plan to start a marijuana growing operation, one of the first decisions you’ll need to make is whether to grow cannabis indoors or outdoors. As you might expect, both propositions have advantages and disadvantages.

Outdoor Cultivation
If you reside in a country with unjust laws against marijuana cultivation, you should seriously consider growing outdoors. Bar none, the biggest advantage to growing outdoors is security. It’s much more difficult for authorities to catch marijuana growers who plant seeds in the spring and come back in the fall for harvest rather than indoor growers who sit on their crop all year long.

Perhaps the safest way to cultivate marijuana outdoors is by planting seeds within a forest that has small open pockets for sunlight to peak through. Buy yourself a GPS (Global Positioning System) to mark the exact latitude and longitude of your ! crop’s location. In the fall when it’s time to harvest your crop, let the GPS device guide you back to your fully grown plants. Make sure to check the accuracy of the GPS before you make a purchase. An inexpensive GPS device may only guide you within 100 meters of your crop, while others advertise accuracy within 10 feet.

One advantage of growing marijuana outdoors is low maintenance. Mother Nature will do all the work for you in the outdoor environment, unlike indoor crops where the outdoor environment must be recreated.

The biggest disadvantage to outdoor cultivation is the limitation of one crop per year. Unless you live in a warm climate all year long, the marijuana season starts in the spring and ends in the fall. Another disadvantage is the possibility of law enforcement, thieves, or wildlife destroying your coveted plants.

Indoor Cultivation
The main advantage to growing marijuana indoors is the ability to! grow year-round. The climate can be artificially adjusted indoors, so marijuana can be fooled into believing when to vegetate and when to flower.

The biggest disadvantage of growing indoors is security. It’s difficult (if not impossible) to hide the smell of marijuana while creating ample ventilation at the same time. Also, it becomes a challenge to contain abnormally strong light from leaking through windows. Even under perfect circumstances, non-violent marijuana offenders have spent years in prison because of freak accidents like fires or nosy landlords.

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