Posts Tagged ‘indica’

The Need For Weed and The Persistent Myth of the Gateway Drug

Obama, gateway drug, stereotypes, stories, Reese Rose

I initially wanted to start this story as a discussion surrounding the various stories that weed smokers have about our shared indulgence. As I was reading this New York Press article by Reese Rose I was pulled into her intricate and comforting description of the world of pot. It was only after I had written a few lines before I realized that Reese Rose’s story is also a perfect example of how some people try weed and then they just as abruptly stop using it.

It is not that I had some spiritual or moral awakening. And the run-in with the law that night did not exactly amount to a sobering moment. But in time, I moved out of the house, the DJ and I stopped being friends and the endless supply of weed was no longer available or free. Being a pothead is a lot less appealing when you have to start working at it.

This story clearly dispels the myth that marijuana is a ‘gateway drug‘; actually marijuana has been shown to be among the drugs that a person will abuse if they have the potential to be a drug abuser over all. Meaning that if they couldn’t get their hands on marijuana they may be just as likely to sniff glue or huff aerosol cans which is a whole ‘other issue.

Either way, Reese Rose told a good pot story and I’m sure she’s not the only one with a great toke story to tell. That got me to reminiscing about my best weed smoking story. Do you have an ill weed story? If so let us know, tweet it, blog it or Tumblr-er it and don’t forget to use the hashtag #HMJ or #MyHMJWeedStory so we can find your story. Because we all love a good weed story, right?

Super Criss Cross Joint (Picture)

Check out this double criss cross joint. Are you kidding me?
Send us your videos if you attempt to make this and/or smoke it!!!

So dope!!!

7 cannabis studies that will change everything…

​​ Welcome to Room 420, where your instructor is Mr. Ron Marczyk and your subjects are wellness, disease prevention, self actualization, and chillin’.
Worth Repeating
​By Ron Marczyk, R.N.
Since the 1960s, the major milestones our country has achieved are incredible.
We elected an African-American president, women’s issues have made tremendous progress, and gays and lesbians can marry.
But cannabis is still illegal…?  Not for long! 
As the tsunami of hard empirical positive medical cannabis research builds, it meets the inevitable changing younger demographics of our country, and with the need for new cannabis- based jobs and new tax revenue.
The cannabis legalization tipping point is close at hand!
“Cannabis is the people’s medicine” and has overwhelming public support.
Let’s knock this last domino over!
And to that end…
I would like to highlight several 2011 research papers that discuss the most current findings regarding medical cannabis treatment and disease prevention.

The following medical papers focus on:
• Cancer and colon cancer prevention,
• Inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, colitis, Crohn’s disease
• Vomiting from chemotherapy
• Osteoporosis
• Traumatic brain injury
• Heart disease /Heart attack
The concept of the endocannabinoid system was outlined a mere 14 years ago, and looks how far we have come!
Today “phytocannabinoid therapeutics” is the newest, fastest growing field in medical research.
As this medical cannabis evidence-based tsunami approaches, its main therapeutic action appears to restoring homeostasis to multiple body systems.
The action by which phytocannabinoids heal is by reestablishing the proper immune set points within CB 1/2 receptors in both brain and body.
Perhaps the root of many human illnesses is an anandamide deficiency, which, when corrected and rebalanced by THC intake, produces homeostasis.
Whatever anandamide does in the body, phytocannabinoids mimic. My prediction is that phytocannabinoids will ultimately be found to be an vital to human health.
Phytocannabinoids mimic the same actions of Anandamide in the brain and body, which maintain homeostasis, maintaining wellness and disease prevention!    

Cannabinoid Uses.jpg
Graphic: TRENDS In Pharmacological Sciences
Pharmacological actions of non-psychotropic cannabinoids (with the indication of the proposed mechanisms of action). Abbreviations: D 9 -THC, D 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol; D 8 -THC, D 8 -tetrahydrocannabinol; CBN, cannabinol; CBD, cannabidiol; D 9 -THCV, D 9 -tetrahydrocannabivarin; CBC, cannabichromene; CBG, cannabigerol; D 9 -THCA, D 9 -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid; CBDA, cannabidiolic acid; TRPV1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1; PPARg, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g; ROS, reactive oxygen species; 5-HT1A, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtype 1A; FAAH, fatty acid amide hydrolase. (+), direct or indirect activation; “, increase; #, decrease.
It’s All About THC
THC is unique, in that it is only found in one plant on earth.
Thumbnail image for power-flower.jpeg
Photo: Rhinoseeds
Power Flower strain
​ The female cannabis plant is a THC-resin factory. THC, which makes up the plant’s resin, has the important job of collecting pollen from the male plant for fertilization. No THC-laced resin, no seed production.  Additionally, this resin tastes very bad to herbivores, which leave it alone, and it also offers superior UV protection to the plant at high altitudes.
A cannabis sativa flower coated with trichomes, which contain more THC than any other part of the plant
The cannabis plant has only two functions: to make THC and seeds.
THC is the most abundant “phytocannabinoid” within the cannabis plant.
All other THC-like substances in the plant are THC intermediate metabolites being assembled by the plant on their way to becoming THC.
Once the plant is cut down and dies, the THC degrades into cannabindiol.  Cannabinol (CBN) is the primary product of THC degradation, and there is usually little of it in a fresh plant. CBN content increases as THC degrades in storage, and with exposure to light and air, and it is only mildly psychoactive.
Why would just this one plant, and the phytocannabinoids it produces control not one, but two dedicated molecular receptors for phytocannabinoids, with more predicted to still be discovered?
Did evolution intend for them to be naturally consumed for proper body function? As any other plant-derived antioxidant?
How THC talks to the brain and immune system
marijuana-brain.gif
Graphic: How Stuff Works
​All healing, cancer fighting and aging in your body is controlled by the immune system.
Phytocannabinoids appear to control the activity level of the immune system up or down, so that it doesn’t attack its host or respond too weakly to cellular dysfunction. Whenever you hear the term “anti-inflammatory activity,” think “cannabis immune system control.”
CB1 cannabigenic receptors are the majority of receptor type in the synaptic clef. THC-activated CB1 brain receptors directly link up and control the microglial cells in the brain; the microglia is the specialized white blood cells that make up the brain’s dedicated immune system.
Cannabidiol is degraded THC. It activates CB2 receptors mostly in the body. In both cases, THC controls both immune systems (brain and body), in one form or another. It seems that CB1 brain receptors link up to CB2 body receptors, which in turn control many autoimmune diseases.
The word used to describe this cannabis brain/body link up is Psychoneuroimmunology.
Mind = neurotransmitter = immune system communication system, or in this case
Cannabinergic Psychoneuroimmunology” — cannabinoid-induced immune system healing.
Cannabis consciousness repairs your immune system: never underestimate the power of a bong hit!
#1:   “The Endocannabinoid System and Cancer: Therapeutic Implication” 
264519d82c1dad9caf934a7f49f5b461-196x196.jpeg
Photo: WhyProhibition.ca
​Findings: Delta 9 THC as a treatment for breast, prostate, brain and bone cancer
“This review updates the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and anti-tumor actions (inhibition of cell proliferation and migration, induction of apoptosis, reduction of tumor growth) of the cannabinoids in different types of cancer.”
“The therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for cancer, as identified in clinical trials, is also discussed. Identification of safe and effective treatments to manage and improve cancer therapy is critical to improve quality of life and reduce unnecessary suffering in cancer patients.”
“In this regard, cannabis-like, compounds offer therapeutic potential for the treatment of breast, prostate and bone cancer in patients. Further basic research on anti-cancer properties of cannabinoids as well as clinical trials of cannabinoid therapeutic efficacy in breast, prostate and bone cancer is therefore warranted.”
“The available literature suggests that the endocannabinoid system may be targeted to suppress the evolution and progression of breast, prostate and bone cancer as well as the accompanying pain syndromes. Although this review focuses on these three types of cancer, activation of the endocannabinoid signaling system produces anti-cancer effects in other types of cancer including skin, brain gliomas and lung.”
“Interestingly, cannabis trials in population based studies failed to show any evidence for increased risk of respiratory symptoms/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or lung cancer (Tashkin, 2005) associated with smoking cannabis.”
“Moreover, synthetic cannabinoids (Delta 9 THC) and the endocannabinoid system play a role in inhibiting cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis, reducing tumor growth and metastases and inducing apoptosis ( self destruction for cancer cells) in all three types of cancers reviewed here.
“These observations raise the possibility that a dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system may promote cancer, by fostering physiological conditions that allow cancer cells to proliferate, migrate and grow.”
IMPORTANT: This is a very intriguing observation. What is being implied here is that some people may be suffering from an anandamide deficiency! Just as a diabetic is insulin deficiencient and must supplement their body with insulin, in this case THC is the vital medicine needed to replace low levels of anandamide.
These observations also raise the exciting possibility that enhancing cannabinoid tone (code for THC locking into the CB1 receptor) through cannabinoid based pharmacotherapies may attenuate these harmful processes to produce anti-cancer effects in humans.
Bottom line:  Smoking marijuana prevents cancer body-wide.
#2:  “Update on the Endocannabinoid System as an Anticancer Target” 
icon_closerlook.jpeg
Graphic: Americans for Safe Access
​Findings: antitumor effects, cancer prevention
“Recent studies have shown that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) could offer an attractive antitumor target. Numerous findings suggest the involvement of this system (constituted mainly by cannabinoid receptors, endogenous compounds and the enzymes for their synthesis and degradation) in cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.”
“This review covers literature from the past decade which highlights the potential of targeting the ECS for cancer treatment. In particular, the levels of endocannabinoids and the expression of their receptors in several types of cancer are discussed, along with the signaling pathways involved in the endocannabinoid antitumor effects.”
“Furthermore, targeting the ECS with agents that activate cannabinoid receptors (This means THC) or inhibitors of endogenous degrading systems such as fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors may have relevant therapeutic impact on tumor growth. Additional studies into the downstream consequences of endocannabinoid treatment are required and may illuminate other potential therapeutic targets.”
#3:  “Cannabinoids and the gut: new developments and emerging concepts”
medical-marijuana_5.jpeg
Photo: Top News
​Findings: THC and inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), colitis, colon cancer, vomiting/chemotherapy
“Disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract have been treated with herbal and plant-based remedies for centuries. Prominent amongst these therapeutics are preparations derived from the marijuana plant Cannabis.  Cannabis has been used to treat a variety of GI conditions that range from enteric infections and inflammatory conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to disorders of motility, emesis and abdominal pain.”
“Cannabis has been used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) conditions that range from enteric infections and inflammatory conditions to disorders of motility, emesis and abdominal pain.”
“The mechanistic basis of these treatments emerged after the discovery of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol as the major constituent of Cannabis. Further progress was made when the receptors for Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol were identified as part of an endocannabinoid system, that consists of specific cannabinoid receptors.”
Screen Shot 2011-08-07 at 1.08.42 PM.png
Sites of action of cannabinoids in the enteric nervous system. CB2 receptors indicated with the marijuana leaf.
​  “Anatomical, physiological and pharmacological studies have shown that the endocannabinoid system is widely distributed throughout the gut, with regional variation and organ-specific actions.” (CB2 receptors are embedded within the lining of the intestines in large numbers.)
“They are involved in the regulation of food intake, nausea and emesis, gastric secretion and gastro protection, GI motility, ion transport, visceral sensation, intestinal inflammation and cell proliferation in the gut.”
“As we have shown, the endocannabinoid system is widely distributed throughout the gut, with regional variation and specific regional or organ-specific actions.”
“CB2 receptors are involved in the regulation of food intake, nausea and emesis, gastric secretion and gastro protection, GI motility, ion transport, visceral sensation, intestinal inflammation and cell proliferation (cancer)”
Screen Shot 2011-08-07 at 1.10.04 PM.png
How THC/cannabidiol activates the CB1/2 receptors to shut down colon cancer by signaling cancer cells to self-destruct
​ “Preclinical models have shown that modifying the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects…. Pharmacological agents that act on these targets have been shown in preclinical models to have therapeutic potential.” [THC is the Pharmacological agent mentioned.]
Colorectal Cancer Prevention Model

Cannabiols via CB1 and possibly CB2 receptor activation, have been shown to exert apoptotic actions in several colorectal cancer cell lines.
See the illustration at left for how THC/cannabidiol activates the CB1/2 receptors to shut down colon cancer by signaling cancer cells to self-destruct.
#4:   “Gut feelings about the endocannabinoid system”
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Graphic: CMR Journal
Schematic illustration of the functional roles of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the gastrointestinal tract. The ECS regulates four major functional elements in the gut: motility, secretion, inflammation, and sensation in health and disease. Major components of the ECS that have been defined in each of these functional roles are shown: CB1 and CB2 receptors, anandamide (AEA), fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and the endocannabinoid membrane transporter (EMT). For motility, the CB2 receptors only appear to be active under pathophysiological conditions and are shown italicized.
​ Findings: Stemming from the centuries-old and well known effects of Cannabis on intestinal motility and secretion, research on the role of the endocannabinoid system in gut function and dysfunction has received ever increasing attention since the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids.
In this article, some of the most recent developments in this field are discussed, with particular emphasis on new data, most of which are published in Neurogastroenterology & Motility, on the potential tonic endocannabinoid control of intestinal motility, the function of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors in gastric function, visceral pain, inflammation and sepsis, the emerging role of cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptors in the gut, and the pharmacology of endocannabinoid-related molecules and plant cannabinoids not necessarily acting via cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.
These novel data highlight the multi-faceted aspects of endocannabinoid function in the GI tract, support the feasibility of the future therapeutic exploitation of this signaling system for the treatment of GI disorders, and leave space for some intriguing new hypotheses on the role of endocannabinoids in the gut.
#5: “Cannabinoids and the skeleton: from marijuana to reversal of bone loss”
cannabinoid.jpeg
Graphic: Medicinal Cannabis
​Findings: CB2 receptors maintain bone remodeling balance, thus protecting the skeleton against age-related bone loss.
The active component of marijuana, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, activates the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, thus mimicking the action of endogenous cannabinoids.
CB1 is predominantly neuronal and mediates the cannabinoid psychotropic effects. CB2 is predominantly expressed in peripheral tissues, mainly in pathological conditions. So far the main endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, have been found in bone at ‘brain’ levels.
The CB1 receptor is present mainly in skeletal sympathetic nerve terminals, thus regulating the adrenergic tonic restrain of bone formation. CB2 is expressed in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, stimulates bone formation, and inhibits bone resorption.
Because low bone mass is the only spontaneous phenotype so far reported in CB2 mutant mice, it appears that the main physiologic involvement of CB2 is associated with maintaining bone remodeling at balance, thus protecting the skeleton against age-related bone loss.
Indeed, in humans, polymorphisms in CNR2, the gene encoding CB2, are strongly associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Preclinical studies have shown that a synthetic CB2-specific agonist rescues ovariectomy-induced bone loss.
Taken together, the reports on cannabinoid receptors in mice and humans pave the way for the development of 1) diagnostic measures to identify osteoporosis-susceptible polymorphisms in CNR2, and 2) cannabinoid drugs to combat osteoporosis.
Endocannabinoid cell.jpg
Graphic: Fit Body Bootcamp
​​Findings: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents the leading cause of death in young individuals.
FINDING:  THC activation of the CB1 receptor is the same as the action of anaidemide on CB1 This article discusses how anandamide increases in the brain after injury, so THC may have the potential to become a front line emergency medicine in the future.
“There is a large body of evidence showing that eCB are markedly increased in response to pathogenic traumatic head injury events.”
“This fact, as well as numerous studies on experimental models of brain toxicity, neuroinflammation and trauma supports the notion that the eCB are part of the brain’s compensatory or repair mechanisms.”
These are mediated via CB receptors signalling pathways that are linked to neuronal survival and repair. The levels of 2-AG, the most highly abundant eCB, are significantly elevated after TBI and when administered to TBI mice, 2-AG decreases brain edema, inflammation and infarct volume and improves clinical recovery.( So would THC.)
This review is focused on the role the eCB system plays as a self-neuroprotective mechanism and its potential as a basis for the development of novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of CNS pathologies with special emphasis on TBI.
Bottom line:  For proof see U.S government 2003 patent
#7:  “Acute administration of cannabidiol in vivo suppresses ischaemia-induced cardiac arrhythmias and reduces infarct size when given at reperfusion”
cbd-cannabis-marijuana.jpeg
Graphic: Cannabis N.I.
Not only is CBD cardioprotective — it is also an anti-epileptic, sedative, anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antioxidant, neuroprotectant, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-emetic, and anti-tumorant.
​ Findings:  Cannabidiol (CBD) is a phytocannabinoid, with anti-apoptotic, (the process of programmed cell death) anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and has recently been shown to exert a tissue sparing effect during chronic myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R).
However, it is not known whether CBD is cardioprotective in the acute phase of I/R injury and the present studies tested this hypothesis.
EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either vehicle or CBD (10 or 50 microg kg(-1) i.v.) 10 min before 30 min coronary artery occlusion or CBD (50 microg kg(-1) i.v.) 10 min before reperfusion (2 h). The appearance of ventricular arrhythmias during the ischaemic and immediate post-reperfusion periods were recorded and the hearts excised for infarct size determination and assessment of mast cell degranulation. Arterial blood was withdrawn at the end of the reperfusion period to assess platelet aggregation in response to collagen.
KEY RESULTS: “CBD reduced both the total number of ischaemia-induced arrhythmias and infarct size when administered prior to ischaemia, an effect that was dose-dependent. Infarct size was also reduced when CBD was given prior to reperfusion. CBD (50 microg kg(-1) i.v.) given prior to ischaemia, but not at reperfusion, attenuated collagen-induced platelet aggregation compared with control, but had no effect on ischaemia-induced mast cell degranulation.”
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: “This study demonstrates that CBD is cardioprotective in the acute phase of I/R by both reducing ventricular arrhythmias and attenuating infarct size. The anti-arrhythmic effect, but not the tissue sparing effect, may be mediated through an inhibitory effect on platelet activation.”
Remember to exercise your ganja rights! Every day is a Ganja day!

Marijuana Users Ain’t “Stupid Stoners”

article image

By NORML on Jul 27, 2011

The consumption of cannabis, even long-term, poses few adverse effects on cognitive performance, according to clinical trial data to be published in the scientific journal Addiction.

Investigators at the University of Melbourne and the Australian National University, Center for Mental Health Research assessed the impact of cannabis use on various measures of memory and intelligence in over 2,000 self-identified marijuana consumers and non-users over an eight-year period.

Among cannabis consumers, subjects were grouped into the following categories: ‘heavy’ (once a week or more) users, ‘light’ users, ‘former heavy’ users, ‘former light’ users, and ‘always former’ — a category that consisted of respondents who had ceased using marijuana prior to their entry into the study.

Researchers reported: “Only with respect to the immediate recall measure was there evidence of an improved performance associated with sustained abstinence from cannabis, with outcomes similar to those who had never used cannabis at the end point. On the remaining cognitive measures, after controlling for education and other characteristics, there were no significant differences associated with cannabis consumption.”

They concluded, “Therefore, the adverse impacts of cannabis use on cognitive functions either appear to be related to pre-existing factors or are reversible in this community cohort even after potentially extended periods of use.”

Separate studies have previously reported that long-term marijuana use is not associated with residual deficits in neurocognitive function. Specifically, a 2001 study published in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry found that chronic cannabis consumers who abstained from the drug for one week “showed virtually no significant differences from control subjects (those who had smoked marijuana less than 50 times in their lives) on a battery of 10 neuropsychological tests. … Former heavy users, who had consumed little or no cannabis in the three months before testing, [also] showed no significant differences from control subjects on any of these tests on any of the testing days.”

Additionally, studies have also implied that cannabis may be neuroprotective against alcohol-induced cognitive deficits. A 2009 study by investigators at the University of California and San Diego reported that binge drinkers who also used cannabis experienced significantly less white matter damage to the brain as compared to subjects who consumed alcohol alone.

For more information regarding the impact of cannabis on brain function, see NORML’s factsheet ‘Cannabis and the Brain: A User’s Guide,’ here.\

[Editor’s note: This post is excerpted from this week’s forthcoming NORML weekly media advisory. To have NORML’s media alerts and legislative advisories delivered straight to your in-box, sign up here.]

Marijuana Strains Used For Medicine

Marijuana Strains used for Medicine

White Widow weed

There are thousands of marijuana strains, with more being bred. Many of these types of marijuana are obscure only known by a select few. All of these have some medical benefit to the user.

There are two main categories of weed:

1) Sativa – Gives you a high, uplifting feeling and a general sense of well being. The effects are more cerebral and less feeling of being stoned within your body.

It can be used to treat Multiple Sclerosis and Epilepsy.

Durban Poison Cannabis and Haze Marijuana are excellent Sativa marijuana strains.

2) Indica – Provide a pleasant body stoned sensation.

It is commonly used for depression, anxiety, pain relief and Insomnia.

Northern Lights marijuana and White Widow are considered to be among the best Indica Cannabis strains.

There are also strains which are a combination of Indica and Sativa.

To find out more about the differences between these categories of weed visit our Sativa vs Indica post.

Here is a short list of the popular strains and what conditions they can be used to treat:

  • white widow Weed – Depression, Anxiety, Reduced Appetite , Cachexia, Hepatitis C and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
  • purple kush Weed – Pain, Depressive Disorder and Anxiety.
  • Ak 47 Weed – Pain Relief, Stress, Nausea, Depression, Insomnia, Headache
  • Blueberry Marijuana – Chronic pain, Arthralgia, Muscle pain, Diarrhea, Muscle spasm, Insomnia, Emotional lability, AIDS, Nausea, Gastrointestinal disorder, Anorexia, Depressive disorder and Anxiety.

It can be difficult to work out which weed strain you should use to treat your condition.

There can be several different strains which can be used to help you with your ailment or you may have multiple medical conditions. In this case it may be necessary to smoke more than one strain. Also you may build up a resistance to a particular strain, so varying the types of marijuana can be effective.

Your marijuana doctor is the best person to help you choose the right type of marijuana or an experienced budtender can potentially help. Make sure you find out the background of the budtender to see whether they are in a position of authority to give advice on medical marijuana strains.

Our medical conditions page has recommendations of which strains to use to treat particular conditions.

Please have your say on which marijuana strains should be used to treat particular conditions at our forum.

Thanks, Medical Marijuana Blog! http://www.medicalmarijuanablog.com/marijuana-strains

What Is The Best Strain Of Medical Marijuana For Helping Nausea?

Nausea

The use of medical marijuana to relieve nausea is well established, both anecdotally and from research papers. Both THC and cannabinoids are known to mitigate nausea, and smoking weed gives better relief from vomiting that taking THC orally.

A two studies undertaken in 2007 revealed that THC improves appetite and reduced weight loss in AIDS patients and smoking medical marijuana led to an increased intake of cannabis and weight gain.

As nausea and vomiting are side-effects of many treatments and symptoms of many illnesses, marijuana is a powerful drug to have in the medical armory and a synthetic form of THC to be taken in oral form was created for this very reason. However, the majority of patients prefer to smoke or vaporize ‘real’ cannabis instead of taking the artificial form.

What is most exciting about the link between weed and nausea is the fact that in cases where standard anti-emetics have failed to provide any relief, medical marijuana did the job. A recent study published in the New York State Journal of Medicine reported on 56 patients who were given marijuana following the failure of traditional anti-emetic drugs to relieve their sickness. The astounding result was a 78% success rate in this group of patients after smoking medical marijuana.

How to I use Medical Marijuana for my Nausea
Your very first action, if you are thinking about treating your nausea with medical marijuana, is to check out the medical marijuana state laws where you live. Despite the evidence of its usefulness in this situation, nausea doesn’t appear on the qualifying medical conditions of every state.

Having said that, you may well find that your primary condition – the illness which is causing you to feel sick and/or vomit – does appear on the approved list. Cancer, for instance, is pretty universal as far as state laws go.

If you discover that you can legally use marijuana to ease your nausea, you will need to find a medical marijuana doctor.

Dank Marijuana Nugget

Are there any Particular Medical Marijuana Strains that are Good for Nausea
The Indica dominant Chemo strain of marijuana was reputedly developed by Dr David Suzuki back in the 1970s for the specific role of treating the nausea and pain that is associated with chemotherapy treatment.

Users report a pleasant aroma – a very important factor when dealing with nausea. As far as flavor is concerned, when allowed to linger in the mouth, there is a distinctly sweet and sugary taste.

Chemo makes an excellent night time medicine as it helps with pain as well as nausea – it’s particularly good for relieving stomach pain. Because of its indica dominance (almost 100%) it does not leave behind any feelings of anxiety or paranoia.

If you live in a state where cultivation of medical marijuana is allowed, then Chemo is quick to flower and gives high yields – around 500 grams per square meter. Seeds are widely available.

Lots of good quality research together with pretty powerful anecdotal stories make it very difficult to ignore the fact that medical marijuana does help ease the symptoms of nausea.

Courtesy of the Medical Marijuana Blog

http://www.theweedblog.com/what-is-the-best-strain-of-medical-marijuana-for-helping-nausea/

How To Spot The Differences Between Indica & Sativa

Even though marijuana (read: cannabis sativa or cannabis indica) is, according the US Justice Department, “one of the safest therapeutically active substances known to man”, it still remains illegal. That’s why there’s precious little facts scientists know about the plant and the substances the plant produces. What we do know however, is that Cannabis is an extremely complex plant that’s divided up into three species, two of which are psychoactive and one (cannabis ruderalis), which isn’t.

Sativa v indica

Now Let’s start with Cannabis indica

To be clear, both Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa are annual plants in the Cannabaceae family. Cannabis indica is a putative species of the genus Cannabis. The strain probably originated from the Hindu Kush mountain range in central Afghanistan, which is known for extraordinarily frigid winters and searing hot summers. This gives the plant a short, dense look, oftentimes with broad, forest green colored fan leaves. The leaves darker color is due to their higher amounts of chlorophyll. The flowers (or ‘buds’) are generally heavy and fragrant and they tend to grow in pod clusters. Indicas are the faster growing varietal, typically with flowering times between 6 to 9 weeks. Even though the indica plants are smaller, their denser nugs usually yield higher amounts than sativas, plus they lend themselves to indoor growing better since the plants don’t get as tall as the sativas.

Effects of a good Cannabis indica

Indica is typically the variety most associated with being ‘stoned’, eg sitting on the couch, deep feeling of relaxation behind your eyes, loosening of your limbs and muscles. Your physicals senses are typically heightened such that listening to music, eating food or touching different textures feels incredibly rewarding. Indicas are great for relaxation due to their higher CBD and CBN levels than sativas (although some indicas also contain large amounts of THC as well). Some of the most potent medical marijuana for body pain, anxiety and appetite loss come from Cannabis indica, including Master Kush, G-13, Bubba Kush and others.

Cannabis sativa, I knew her well

If Cannabis indica is Ernie, than Cannabis sativa is Bert. Cannabis sativa tends to grow tall and thin, with smaller leaves that are brighter in color. In fact, a Cannabis sativa plant can grow up to 25 feet or higher in a single year! Most sativas grow in the 8ft -12ft range and originate from Mexico, Thailand and Colombia. Since they grow taller and use less chlorophyll, flowering can take between 10 to 16 weeks. The yield on a Cannabis sativa plant is typically lower than the indica, but on the flip side the buds are usually more potent and THC more concentrated. The fruity, sweet marijuana strains are almost always sativas.

Effects of a good Cannabis sativa

Cannabis sativas have higher THC content than most indicas and producing more of a ‘head high’. Typically, the effects of a good sativa are a soaring head high, almost like a rush, followed by an energetic feeling that stimulates brain activity and heightening senses. Sativas can be great for depression. Some examples of popular sativa medical marijuana strains are Green Crack, Blue Dream and Super Lemon haze (and pretty any other Haze).

Now of course one plant may exhibit qualities that are germane to both sativa and indica. This plant is typically known as a ‘hybrid’ and very often hybrid strains can be bred to cultivate the best qualities of the sativa and the best qualities of the indica in one super plant. OG Kush is an example of an excellent hybrid strain, so is Super Silver Haze. In fact, most plants are hybrids and very few growers will claim their plants are ’100% sativa’ or ’100% indica’ with any real authority. Although the Dr. Grinsppon strain (named after Harvard author and activist Dr. Lester Grinspoon) found at Barney’s in Amsterdam may just be an exception to this rule, as it exhibits extremely prototypical sativa traits, such as barley even flowering.

Okay hope this helped!

Article From The Medical Marijuana Blog and republished with special permission.

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