Posts Tagged ‘smoking medical marijuana’

Can You Smoke Resin?

Marijuana Resin

What is Resin and How to Smoke it Out of a Bowl

Resin is the byproduct of smoking marijuana and sticks to basically any surface that the marijuana is being smoked out of. The resin is composed of a lot of tar, ash, carbon, and cannabinoids that are inherently found in cannabis. Many people say that this is the unhealthiest way to smoke because of the immense amount of tar that you are inhaling. Unfortunately, sometimes there are difficult financial times or they maybe a drought in your neighborhood.

If this occurs, and you want to use your resin it is pretty easy to get medicated off the resin. You just have to put the flame that comes from your lighter and burn the resin that is in your bowl. A good circular motion makes sure your resin burns evenly.

Another way to hit your resin is scrape all of it from your bowl, in to a ball, and hit the ball. Very simple.

Now, we will get in to the different  areas where you can find resin. Resin pretty much coats your bowl from top to bottom so you can hit the resin in many different ways. Put your thumb over your bowl; you are going to use your bowl as the shot gun. Now put your flame up to the shot gun and take a hit while keeping the flame lit. If you do this correctly the flame will light everything underneath and around your bowl. There are mass amounts of resin reserves in this area.

Now you can use the shotgun as a mouth piece. Keep your thumb on top of the bowl and put your flame by the mouth piece that you would normally use to hit the bowl. There is resin here too.

WARNING: Taking resin hits can heat up your bowl extremely quickly. The bowl can burn you, so let it cool if you are hitting it vigorously.

 

From theweedstreetjournal.com

How To: Make Marijuana S’Mores!

Image via fabulousfinds4.blogspot.com

This week we’re gonna check out a recipe similar to the Leary Biscuit that I posted a few weeks ago, but much more for the sweet tooth. We’re making make some S’mores. STONER S’MORES. Try stacking several on top of each other to create a “Super HIGH S’more Tower”. Send me a picture of your creation and I’ll send you some stickers. Send your pictures to ThisBuds4You@HailMaryJane.com.

What We’ll Need:

2 graham crackers

a piece of chocolate or a teaspoon of Nutella

1 large marshmallow puff

1 gram (ish) of weed, ground into a fine powder

DIRECTIONS

  1. Take a graham cracker, use either chocolate or Nutella (a chocolate hazelnut spread), make a layer on graham cracker
  2. Place about 1 gram of the powdered herb on the chocolate or Nutella
  3. Place a marshmallow on the herb
  4. Place second graham cracker on top
  5. Toast for 5-7 minutes at 300 degrees F or microwave for 30-45 seconds (depending on the microwave)

NOTES

  • Graham crackers can be good, but can get yucky in microwaves.
  • In a toaster oven, toast on a piece of aluminum foil to keep the chocolate from running messily.
  • If using real chocolate, make sure to melt the chocolate.
  • The general idea is to cook the cracker but not burn it.

http://hailmaryjane.com/

Support Marijuana Legalization And Get Ypur Name On A Virtual Brick

Legalize it!

Two weeks ago, we launched our new organization, the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform (CCPR), to bring citizens together to work toward legalizing marijuana in2012.

Already, thousands of people like you have stood up and pledged their support for going back to the ballot next year.

With that kind of support, I am confident that we can win. Together, we’re going to build this organization, brick by brick, and lay the foundation for an even stronger grassroots movement — but we need your help to do it.

That’s why, today, we are launching our Founding Members program. With a contribution of $25 or more, we’ll place your name on your own personalized virtual brick on our website’s Founders Wall, publicly recognizing you as a Founding Member of the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform.

Contribute $25 to our Founding Member drive today — and have a brick added in your name to our virtual wall!

Become a Founding Member of CCPR

To recognize friends like you, we’re building a virtual brick wall, symbolizing the support we have for cannabis policy reform.

Each brick represents a supporter of the cause, with his or her name engraved on the front, along with a personalized comment. Our virtual wall will let the world know everyone who is a part of this new effort from the very start.

Every contribution counts. If we build our virtual wall with just 1,000 bricks, we’ll have already raised $25,000 for our cause.

Will you buy your own personalized brick right now — so we can add your name to our Founding Member wall?

Show your support for building the grassroots movement that will tax and legalize cannabis in California: Contribute $25 and get your own personalized brick added to our Founding Member wall!

Your contribution to CCPR will help us build the movement we need to end cannabis prohibition in California. Together, we can lead the nation to a more sensible drug policy — brick by brick.

We are extremely grateful for your support.

Dale Jones
Chair
Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform

P.S. Want to check out how the Founding Member wall is already shaping up? Click here to check it out — and then click here to buy your own personalized virtual brick.

Arizona Governor Can’t Stop Medical Marijuana

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Photo: Opposing Views
Jan Brewer was against Proposition 203 before it passed — and now that it’s law, she wants to ignore the voters.
​Prosecutors will still be prohibited from convicting legal medical marijuana patients

The misguided efforts of Arizona Governor Jan Brewer and Attorney General Tom Horne to quash the state’s new medical marijuana won’t work, reports Ray Stern at Phoenix New Times.

Authorized patients can possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis legally in Arizona since the passage of Proposition 203 by voters — without or without “state approval,” New Times reports.
“That’s why Brewer and Horne, two Republicans who are putting politics above the wishes of the electorate, haven’t mentioned any plans to stop the state from handing out medical marijuana registration cards,” Stern writes. “The smartly written Arizona Medical Marijuana Act anticipated an anti-democratic reaction like the one we saw Tuesday and included a powerful work-around.”

Arizona law requires:
If the department fails to issue a registry identification card within forty-five days of the submission of a valid application or renewal, the registry identification card shall be deemed issued, and a copy of the registry identification card application or renewal is deemed a valid registry identification card.
The governor understands this self-enacting part of the law, admitted her spokesman Matt Benson.
Though Gov. Brewer and AG Horne have said they’ll likely tell the Arizona Department of Health Services to put the dispensary program on hold until a federal court rules on its legality (stacked deck, anyone?), DHS “will continue issuing those cards as they have been until further notice.”
Which means anyone with a copy of a registration card application can legally possess marijuana, but the state has no record of them.
“Without going into all the hypotheticals of the situation, suffice to say that Arizonans who want to qualify to legally possess marijuana under state law can do so,” Stern writes. “They can keep applying for and receiving state-approved cards, or, if the state stops taking registration card applications, they can just keep their unapproved applications handy.
“Prosecutors will still be prohibited from convicting legal medical marijuana patients,” Stern writes.
Qualified patients will still be allowed to grow up to five plants at home, as long as no dispensary opens within 25 miles. And “Thanks to the way Brewer and Horne are sticking it to voters, no dispensary will open anytime soon,” Stern writes.
As of Tuesday, the DHS had approved 3,696 medical marijuana applications since April 14 [PDF].
Applications don’t appear to have tapered off after Brewer and Horne’s announcement, according to DHS spokeswoman Laura Oxley.

Drug Warriors Won’t Play Cannabis Reformers In Softball

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Photo: Anastacia Cosner
The One Hitters are already kicking the Drug War’s ass — now they want to beat the drug warriors in a softball game

Once again, the softball team representing the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) has backed out of playing a softball game against the One Hitters, a team consisting of members of several drug policy reform organizations and others who want to end the “War On Drugs.”

A game between the two teams had been scheduled for May 25, but the ONDCP Czardinals chickened out shortly after scheduling the game, with ONDCP public liaison coordinator Quinn Staudt claiming an “accidental double-booking.”
This is not the first time the Czardinals have refused to play the One Hitters.
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Photo: Anastacia Cosner
The One Hitters dominate the Congressional Softball League
​ In six years, the team of drug warriors has managed to find one lame reason or another to avoid taking the field against the One Hitters, made up of individuals dedicated to reforming the out-of-date and ineffectual policies promoted by the ONDCP.
This behavior is being mimicked on the national stage by the ONDCP as well, according to the reformers.
While Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske claimed he would no longer use the rhetoric of a “War On Drugs” and President Obama said he wants to treat drug abuse more as a health problem than a criminal justice issue, little has been seen in the way of action in that direction.
The President has also said he does not support the legalization of any drug — even marijuana — despite the inarguable damage marijuana prohibition does to society, individual users, medical patients that benefit from cannabis treatments, governmental budgets, and respect for the rule of law.
“It is really disappointing that the ONDCP not only refuses to have an honest debate with drug policy reformers about the absolute failure of drug prohibition, but also keeps ducking out of softball games with us,” said One Hitters team captain Jacob Berg.
“We think it would be a great opportunity to advance the discussion between drug law reformers and the people ostensibly in charge of drug policy in this country,” Berg said. “I wonder if they are afraid to have that conversation.”
“The drug czar said ‘legalization’ isn’t in his vocabulary, but it’s just a friendly softball game!” Berg said.
The One Hitters still hope that Czardinals will put aside ideological differences and accept their invitation to play a softball game this summer on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
TheOneHittersSummerSoftballTeamPhotos0608 sized.jpg
Photo: Anastacia Cosner
The mighty One Hitters strike fear into the hearts of the ONDCP Czardinals and drug warriors everywhere.

Stoner Photo of the Day: Hot Girl Rolling/Smoking Blunt

Come by Cafe Vale Tudo
24601 Raymond Way, Suite 9B
Lake Forest, CA 92630
(949) 454-9227
Open 10 am to 10 pm every day!

Stoner Photo of the Day: When Your Parents Find Out You Smoke

That sucks. Maybe she just wanted to know where you buy your marijuana? Haha.

Marijuana Advocates Sue Government Over Rescheduling Delay

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Photo: MyMedicineTheBook.com
The federal government refuses to reclassify marijuana as medicine — despite the fact that it has sent Irv Rosenfeld and a handful of other patients hundreds of joints a month for close to 30 years.

A coalition of medical marijuana advocacy groups and patients filed suit Monday in D.C. Circuit Court to compel the Obama Administration to answer a nine-year-old petition to reclassify medical marijuana.

The Coalition for Rescheduling Cannabis (CRC) has never received an answer to its 2002 petition, despite a formal recommendation in 2006 from the Department of Health and Human Services to the Drug Enforcement Administration, which is unfortunately the final arbiter in the rescheduling process.
As recently as July 2010, the DEA issued a 54-page “Position on Marijuana,” but failed to even mention the pending CRC petition.
Plaintiffs in the case include the CRC, Americans for Safe Access (ASA), Patients Out of Time, as well as individually named patients, one of whom is listed on the CRC petition but died in 2005.

“The federal government’s strategy has been delay, delay, delay,” said Joe Elford, chief counsel of ASA and lead counsel on the writ. “It is far past time for the government to answer our rescheduling petition, but unfortunately we’ve been forced to go to court in order to get resolution.”
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Photo: ASA
Joe Elford, ASA: “The federal government’s strategy has been delay, delay, delay. It is far past time for the government to answer our rescheduling petition”
​The writ of mandamus filed on Monday accuses the government of unreasonable delay in violation of the Administrative Procedures Act. A previous cannabis (marijuana) rescheduling petition filed in 1972 were unanswered for 22 years before being denied.
The writ argues that cannabis is not a dangerous drug and that ample evidence of its therapeutic value based on scientific studies in the United States and around the world.
“Despite numerous peer-reviewed scientific studies establishing the marijuana is effective” in treating numerous medical conditions, the government “continues to deprive seriously ill persons of this needed, and often life-saving therapy by maintaining marijuana as a Schedcule I substance,” according to the writ.
The writ calls out the government for unlawfully failing to answer the petition despite an Inter-Agency Advisory issued by the Food and Drug Administration in 2006 and “almost five years after receiving a 41-page memorandum from HHS stating its scientific evaluation and recommendations.”
The federal government maintains its Schedule I classification of marijuana even as it gives out hundreds of federal joints every month to a handful of patients — which it has done since 1976, when it created the Investigational New Drug Compassionate Access Program.
Every month, the federal government still sends tins of 300 joints each to the four surviving patients of the original program, which suspended accepting new patients after President George H.W. Bush realized in the early 1990s that a wave of HIV/AIDS patients was on the way.
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Photo: ASA
Steph Sherer, ASA: “Adhering to an outdated public policy that ignores science has created a war zone for doctors and their patients who are seeking to use cannabis therapeutics”
​ The two largest physician groups in the country — the American Medical Association and the American College of Physicians — have both called on the federal government to review marijuana’s status as a Schedule I substance with “no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.”
The National Cancer Institute, a part of the National Institutes for Health, added cannabis to its website earlier this year as a Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM) and recognized that “Cannabis has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years prior to its current status as an illegal substance.”
Medical marijuana has now been legalized in 16 states and the District of Columbia, and has an overwhelming 80 percent approval rating among Americans, according to several polls.
In an 1988 ruling on a prior rescheduling petition, the DEA’s own Administrative Law Judge Francis Young recommended in favor of reclassification, saying “Marijuana, in its natural form, is one of the safest therapeutically active substances known to man.”
A formal rejection of the CRC petition would enable the group to challenge in court the government’s assertion that marijuana has no medical value.
“Adhering to outdated public policy that ignores science has created a war zone for doctors and their patients who are seeking to use cannabis therapeutics,” said Steph Sherer, executive director of ASA and a plaintiff in the writ.
“The Obama Administration’s refusal to act on this petition is an irresponsible stalling tactic,” added Jon Gettman, who filed the rescheduling petition on behalf of the CRC.
A synthetic form of THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in the cannabis plant, is currently classified as a Schedule III substance for its use in a prescribed pill trademarked as Marinol®. The pill goes off-patent this year and companies vying to sell generic versions are petitioning the government to also reclassify the more economical, naturally derived THC (from the plant itself) to Schedule III as well.
The rescheduling process involves federal agencies such as the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), HHS, and DEA. On average, it takes six months from HHS review to final action, but it’s been almost five years since HHS issued its recommendation on the CRC petition — more than twice as long as any other rescheduling petition reviewed since 2002.
More Information

Stoner Photo of The Day: Sativa Sampler Pack

While visiting friendly Dockside Cooperative in the Seattle suburb of Fremont (“the Center of the Universe”), I noticed one welcome innovation that budtender Aaron told me is very helpful in allowing patients to find the strains that work best for them: sampler packs.

Dockside has sampler packs of both sativa strains and indicas, as well as 50/50 packs with four strains of each. Seen in the photo above is a Sativa Sampler Pack I got at Dockside today.

Dude, I haven’t been this excited since my mom would bring home Variety Packs of cereal.
Sampler packs are available for $85 each, which is a bargain considering you get a gram each of eight strains; four of the eight strains go for $15 a gram and the other four go for $12 a gram — that’s $108 worth of medicine for just $85.
Additionally, they have the best selection of edibles I’ve ever seen in Seattle: not just the regular sweets like Rice Krispie treats, cupcakes and brownies, but also savory snacks like lasagna, soups, burritos and even beef jerky.
Two kinds of tinctures, in both glycerin- and alcohol-based formulas, are available, as are numerous topicals, including salve, muscle rubs, bath salts, and foot balm. It’s worthy of note that The Cure tinctures are made with Rick Simpson oil and are quite potent indeed, at $30 a bottle.
Concentrates include honey oil, bubble hash and kief. Kief pills (containing kief in a base of coconut oil) are available at $5 apiece, three for $10.

http://www.tokeofthetown.com/2011/05/stoner_photo_of_the_day_sativa_sampler_pack.php#more

Man Says He Was Fired For Smoking Medical Marijuana

DENVER – Paul Curry says his seven years at MillerCoors came to an abrupt end with one simple conversation.

“They just told me to pack my bags. They brought in security, I emptied out my locker and they told me to go home,” he said.

While MillerCoors cannot comment on the decision to let Curry go, Curry says he was told he was being fired because he had just tested positive for marijuana. Not a surprise, says Curry.

“I’ve been on the [medical marijuana registry] for about a year,” he said.

“All he had was one single positive UA for THC which means that he had used marijuana in that last 30 days. That’s all it means,” Curry’s attorney Rob Corry said.

Corry has made a living advocating on behalf of medical marijuana users over the last few years.

“He’s a medical marijuana patient. He’s trying to follow his doctor’s orders, and he’s trying to do everything he can to manage his [pain],” Corry said.

Corry and Curry insist that the one-time MillerCoors maintenance mechanic was not “high” in any way at the time of the test. They also say his usage was never a factor in his job performance.

As of Tuesday afternoon, MillerCoors had yet to respond to numerous inquiries from 9NEWS, but because the issue falls into the realm of “personnel matters,” it was unlikely to say much about its decision to let Curry go regardless.

On Tuesday, Corry and Curry came to the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment in an effort to secure Curry unemployment benefits. Curry has previously been denied the benefits because of the nature of his dismissal.

Curry and Corry met with a hearing officer for the department. Corry says a decision should come in a few weeks.

A decision made last year by the Colorado Industrial Claim Appeals Office (ICAO) indicates they will likely have a difficult time succeeding in obtaining the benefits. The ICAO is part of the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment and last year issued an opinion that denied unemployment benefits to an unnamed person who was fired after testing positive for marijuana.

“When the Department of Labor issued that opinion, it decided to take a position on that issue,” Holland and Hart employment attorney Emily Hobbs-Wright said.

9NEWS spoke with Hobbs-Wright and fellow Holland and Hart attorney Alyssa Yatsko on Tuesday about the ramifications of the ICAO opinion. Both agreed the decision should not be taken lightly by employees who currently use medical marijuana.

“It’s definitely a risk if you choose to use medical marijuana. It could impact your job,” Hobbs-Wright said.

Amendment 20 (the amendment to the Colorado Constitution that allows the use of medical marijuana on the state level) does include language that offers at least some insight here. It reads, in part, “Nothing in this section shall require any employer to accommodate the medical use of marijuana in any work place.”

That section, based upon the ICAO opinion, has now been interpreted by some to indicate that employees will be at risk for termination should they test positive for marijuana while in the workplace, even when it’s not even presumed that they’re under the influence of marijuana at the time of the test.

As of its last report in late March, the state indicated there were 123,890 people on the Colorado Medical Marijuana Registry.

9NEWS Legal Analyst Scott Robinson says there appears to be plenty of grey area here.

“The number of individuals alone who are using medical marijuana guarantees that this issue will be a hotbed of litigation for years to come,” he said. “The marijuana issue is unique. It’s the only substance in the entire country which is legal locally but illegal everywhere,” he added, pointing to federal law which still outlaws the use and distribution of marijuana.

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