Hawaii Teachers Union Fends Off Random Drug Testing Proposal

Urine Sample

by Phillip Smith

There will be no random drug testing of Hawaii public school teachers. A battle that began in 2007 came to a quiet end earlier this month, when the state government imposed its “last, best, and final” offer to the teachers union — an offer that does not include random drug testing.

Hawaii teachers won’t have to provide these to keep their jobs. (image via wikimedia.org)

The controversy began when the state Board of Education inserted language into the union contract saying the union and the board “shall establish a reasonable suspicion and random drug and alcohol testing procedure for teachers.” The language came in the wake of a handful of widely publicized drug busts of teachers in Hawaii in previous years.

Hawaii State Teachers Association members voted to ratify the contract, but soon, teachers and the HSTA, along with civil libertarians, raised concerns about random drug testing and balked at going along with that contract provision. Gov. Linda Lingle (R) accused teachers of not acting in good faith, and the provision was stalled by challenges at the Hawaii Labor Relations Board and in state court.

The random testing provision ran into another obstacle when the Board of Education in 2008 refused to pay for the tests. The board argued that the nearly half million dollar cost could be better spent in the classroom.

Hawaii

Neither the board nor the union have commented publicly on the demise of the random drug testing provision, but, unsurprisingly, the ACLU is quite happy.

“The ACLU is pleased that none of Hawaii’s educators has been subjected to unconstitutional random drug testing,” said Daniel Gluck, senior staff attorney for the ACLU of Hawaii. “I’m fairly confident it’s not going to come up again,” he told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

While random drug testing is gone, the board and the union agreed to continue a reasonable suspicion drug and alcohol testing policy. Under that policy, teachers who test positive face suspensions of from five to thirty days and will be asked to resign after a third positive test result. Teachers who admit to being impaired or on drugs prior to being tested will not be suspended, but will be required to submit to drug testing for up to a year.

The dropping of the random drug testing provision is one of the few bright spots for Hawaii teachers in the new contract. They may not have to pee in a cup for no good reason, but they will have to endure wage cuts and higher health care premiums.

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