Posts Tagged ‘california news’

Pot Grows, Yet California Judge Rules It Isn’t A Crop

And the stupidity continues with stupid decisions like this going on. Who knew a plant wasn’t a plant apparently?
It grows in the ground, requires sunshine and water to blossom and earns California growers an estimated $17 billion a year. But don’t call marijuana an agricultural crop in Tulare County.
The Fresno Bee (http://bit.ly/pwDIGg) reports that a judge ruled this week against a medical marijuana-growing collective that wanted to operate on land zoned for agriculture.
Tulare County Counsel Kathleen Bales-Lange says it’s the first time that courts have addressed whether marijuana can be classified as an agricultural crop. California voters legalized pot for medicinal purposes in 1996.
The case began when the county Board of Supervisors sued the Foothill Growers Association, which operated in an agriculture-zoned building.
In a ruling finalized Tuesday, Judge Paul Vortmann said the act of growing a controlled substance is not an agricultural use of property.
(Source) http://www.mercurynews.com

Activist Steve Kubby Wants to Regulate Marijuana Like Wine in California

CANNABIS CULTURE – Long-time pot activist Steve Kubby is back with a new marijuana ballot initiative for California. In this interview with Cannabis Culture, he explains why the Golden State should regulate marijuana like wine.

Proposition 19, the ballot initiative to legalize marijuana in California, was narrowly defeated during the November 2010 election. At the time, we figured tenacious activists would start building the next legalization campaign right away. We were right.

Steve Kubby, one of the activists responsible for the successful Proposition 215 that legalized medical marijuana in California in 1996, is back with a new initiative that is already gaining support and making headlines, thanks to the help of some big-name supporters like former US Judge Jim Gray.

In July, Kubby and his team were cleared to begin circulating ballot petitions after the title and summary of their new initiative, The Regulate Marijuana Like Wine Act of 2012, was accepted by the California secretary of states’s office.

Cannabis Culture Editor Jeremiah Vandermeer is pleased to present this interview with Steve Kubby, recorded on Thursday, July 28, 2011.

Cannabis Culture: Great to see all of the positive media attention payed to your proposed initiative in recent weeks. This must be giving the campaign quite a boost.

Steve Kubby: Were pretty happy – I mean we were in USA Today, The Washington Post. I saw a report in Turkey. We were even on a Spanish-language channel in Southern California, so we know there’s a pretty high level of interest.

CC: Does submitting early give you guys an advantage over other ballot initiatives?

SK: We planned all along to submit an initiative in August. I was concerned about how the attorney general would respond to an initiative, and what kind of language they would use, so we submitted this version and sure enough they tried to change our “regulation” initiative to a “legalization” initiative. We know “legalization” doesn’t test at all as high as “regulation”, so we’re going to go back and make sure they give us “regulation”. We’re going to change some terms in our initiative so that it’s more clear-cut that it’s going to be regulated by California’s Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, just as wine is regulated. So it was really very shrewd of us to submit early. We will file early in August which means will be done by the middle of February and the election cycle doesn’t really begin until March. We want to end right there because after March the price for signatures can double and even triple.

Right now if we can complete by March we know that we’ll pay $1.86 a signature, which comes to $1.4 million. We’d rather pay that than $3 or $4 each, which we could get stuck with if we started too late. At the same time we need time to wrap up our fundraising. We have a signed contract with one of the top political fundraisers on the West Coast, we’ve got the Libertarian party helping out, and we’ve got our own network of individuals who believe in our kind of politics.

CC: Have you been in touch with Richard Lee and the activists who ran the Prop 19 campaign? What are their thoughts?

SK: The old Prop 19 folks have created a new organization called the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform. We’ve been in touch with them and we’re looking forward to working with them. They have informed us that none of the funders seem interested in funding a California initiate again; they want to put their money in Colorado and Washington. They’re going after the old funders that I was the first one to get when I ran the Proposition 215 campaign in 1996 and I’ve gone on to other funders. We have our own circle of funders and were not under the same restraints that the other reformed organizations are all under.

CC: Why is the wine regulation model the best one suited for regulating cannabis in California?

SK: First and foremost, wine is something that people understand that can be used in moderation and doesn’t automatically lead to violence or impairment. People are used to the idea of a group getting together, having some wine and then going home or whatever else they’re going to do. So we wanted to put it on that level because that, in fact, is how cannabis is used as well.

If you were an alien from another planet and you came to earth and you suck people doing different activities you would classify pot smoking and wine drinking as highly social interactions with a low potential for violence or injury. So we wanted to put it in that context because that’s where it belongs. It doesn’t need to be regulated like nuclear plutonium. Plutonium is probably easier for researchers to get than marijuana. We didn’t want to put it in the category of hard booze because that would be wrongfully portraying what cannabis is all about – and it would be opening us up to attacks as another form of teenage drinking and abuse. So out of those possibilities, treating it like wine makes the most sense.

In addition to that, Judge Gray and deputy police chief Steven Downing from the LAPD told me their buddies are all telling them privately, “why don’t you just regulate it like booze”. They understand this. Well we compromised and said “how would you feel if we treated it like wine” and Judge Gray and chief Downing agreed. So that was the great unification model for bringing police, judges and activists together.

David Malmo-Levine has done an absolutely fantastic job for us and has published a comprehensive article comparing the California wine and cannabis industries. He has helped to educate Judge Gray and Chief Downing. Chief Downing even told him how much he had learned reading his paper. David is our official online director of communications and we all really appreciate having him on our team.

CC: Has the acceptance of the title and summary boosted the campaigns credibility? How much do public perceptions play into things at this stage and are you being taken more seriously?

SK: I probably have the best track record of anyone in town because I’ve only worked on the successful Prop 215 campaign. Of course, when we started that up, not only were people convinced that we wouldn’t succeed, but nobody, not even the sleaziest sex tabloid, would agree to use the term medical marijuana. They wouldn’t print it and wouldn’t say it. Absolutely wouldn’t tolerate it. So when we finally qualified for the ballot I remember getting some of the staff together and sitting down in front of the television. I remember saying “they’re going to have to say it, they’re going to have to say medical marijuana”. We were all just kind of transfixed about the possibility they would actually say that on television. So they did Prop to 213 and 214 and when they got to 215 they said “medical marijuana” – and then they said it again and again and again. They said it like it was just a regular word and our jaws were on the floor. We were just staring at the TV. Ever since, of course, it’s become an everyday word. But there was that day that it went from the taboo word to the everyday word. So I’ve seen firsthand how people’s perceptions can change once you qualify something for the ballot.

And certainly we are very grateful for all the hard work and trail-blazing that Prop 19 has done for us, because they have paved the way. When we came out, we didn’t qualify for the ballot, we just qualified for the title and summary. That should be a non-event but 260 different media outlets picked it up. We were in all of the media we wanted to be and we are now being taken very seriously.

CC: How does the Regulate Marijuana Like Wine initiative differ from others like Prop 19?

SK: Everything the reform movement is currently working on is limited to one ounce. Washington: one ounce. Colorado, recreational legalization: one ounce. California – I’ve seen the draft that one of the reform organizations is working on and honest to God, they are going for one ounce again. Now, one ounce in California is currently an infraction. Who the Hell is going to raise millions of dollars to turn an infraction into a non-infraction for just an ounce? We have no limit on how much pot is legal. It’s all legal. There’s is a 12-plant limit on growing indoors, but that is it – and no criminal penalties for cultivation, period.

CC: And dried personal amounts?

SK: We’re not even getting into that. We don’t want anyone coming around measuring dried amounts. It’s all legal under our system -– or regulated, as we like to call it. The only way you can screw up is if you sell marijuana and don’t pay the regular sales tax, like you do on anything else that you sell. Unlike Prop 19, we don’t invent any new laws or any new taxes. Sales tax is already in place so there is no need to introduce a new tax.

It’s light-years beyond everybody else but it really sounds reasonable when you read it.

CC: Right now, what’s the best way for people to help you?

SK: Everyone wants to get an initiative petition and start signing up people right away, but we are still 60 days away from that stage. When we’re ready to get signatures, we’re not going to have any volunteer signatures. A very painful lesson that I learned during the Prop 215 campaign is that volunteer signature-gathering does not work. Professional signature gatherers are a must.

So what can people do? They can go to our website and they’ll see we have installed the sign-up form where we can get basic information on them and then there in the system. Then they’ll get the latest updates and can take part in our proactive system. What can they do once their in? Well, this is all about money – I’m sorry but that’s just the reality.

What they can do is help us raise the money. Every $1.80 buys a signature – a validated signature. That’s someone who doesn’t just get the signature but also validates that it’s a registered voter. We need 800,000 signatures, so do the math. We need to raise $1.4 million.

We’ve got the big money coming in later on, but right now it’s really critical that the media sees how much money we can raise each day. Giving us money now in the first few weeks of this campaign is going to determine how respectful and interested the mainstream media is going to be in this campaign. If you don’t send any money later but can just send money in the next week or so, you’ve made the biggest impact you could possibly make. The biggest bang for the buck. And what you’ll be making is a contribution to history.

Read the The Regulate Marijuana Like Wine Act of 2012

Read the CC article “Crystal Clear Glasses and Unbleached Rollies”, a comprehensive comparison and contrasting of the California wine and California cannabis industries by activist David Malmo-Levine.

Stay tuned to Cannabis Culture for more information about the Regulate Marijuana Like Wine initiative in California.

Jeremiah Vandermeer is editor of Cannabis Culture. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

To Weed Or Not To Weed?

By Miggy420

We’ve never said marijuana gives you super powers, makes you smarter or dumber. We’ve never said it’d be cooler if you had some, even though it would be. We never said everyone should smoke (though it might make politicians a little more honest). My whole reason (besides all the unjust imprisonments and lost opportunities) of being an active voice in the legalization is not to make everyone high, I just  want marijuana legal so I can be left alone while doing mine.

To live in a world where you don’t have to worry about cops or shitty pious neighbors, a world where my job and kids can’t be taken away from me. Instead we live in a world where a pothead/stoner/whatever you want to call yourself is a criminal. Instead we live in a world where self proclaimed alcoholics survive and thrive.

I blame the drug war proponents for lives lost; lost due to the inability to qualify for scholarships and other government programs that drug convictions dismiss you from. Lives literally lost in attempts to experiment with something legal for a high.

It’s human nature to want to escape, I remember being in the military trying the “legal weed” just to see what it would do for me – I was not impressed, natural is always the way to go. Within the past year or so there have been a rash of deaths as a result of the “the legal weed” – I blame the drug war proponents. Even the creator of “the legal weed” has come out for the legalization of marijuana.

Legalize it!

Smoking for pleasure is nothing new; Researchers debate Shakespeare’s use of “that noted weed” mentioned in his sonnets. For hard facts it has recently been found in the Gobi desert dating back 2700 yrs ago. So why is something so old made illegal and has remained that way fairly recently?

The times are changing but not soon enough for us die hard, not wanting to go to jail, not wanting the police to raid our homes, not wanting my children taken away, not wanting to fear the police while holding, stoner types. Marijuana has and is again taking a hold in pop culture once again. Take for instance the Late Night munchies Taco Bell commercial; who are they really gunning for? (note to Taco Bell: Sell here!)

As allergy seasons come and go I get more irritated about the law. Have you ever taken a Benadryl? At 6ft 230lbs it’s an uncontrollable high I don’t enjoy and this shit is legal. As our big brother society grows and grows it becomes clearer our signals are all mixed up. The FDA just released what a new pack of cigarettes will look like. A box with images caused by cigarette smoke, I say legalize marijuana and post images of couch potatoes and late night binging on the pack, I’d still buy.

So again why is this natural beautiful thing illegal? State by state, hope develops and then quickly dwindles away when the legislature doesn’t pass or is stuck in some proverbial red tape. Is it because not enough people care? Maybe. Is it because more people feel it should be illegal than not? I don’t think so. For the most part I think the majority of America is okay with knowing a stoner, unless of course that stoner is family mooching off of you, than all you see is a p.o.s not doing what it takes to get a job.

We’re so distracted by the daily inundation of shitty news that we get sidetracked about what really is bad, harmful, or in the end will effect my life Mr. Joe Nobody. Jon Stewart explains it best on a Fox News show that all media is simply laziness and sensationalism. Magazines like High Times took the sting out of the marijuana culture shock back in the day; but now its up to websites like theweedblog, tokeofthetown, and Hailmaryjane taking a bite out of the government crime. We are not criminals, those arrested for a gram up to hundreds of pounds are not criminals and the world has to be kept aware of this.

I recently stopped in one of the most amazing pro-marijuana towns in the world called Big Sky, Montana. The whole thing was happenstance, on my way from Bozeman, Mt. to my next job I picked up a hitchhiker, who turned out to be a seasonal worker in one of the big money resorts. Along the way to Big Sky he invited me to hangout for the night; this is where my adventure began. Here I acquired some local agriculture known as Chanel No#5 which was just as intoxicating as her real name counterpart. Bag in hand; we hopped from local to local seizing the day smoking, drinking, and joking: I met a pretty young woman facing federal charges because she was caught with 14 grams in Yellowstone Park (which is Federal land). During that night she smoked like a champ and knew of the penalties that she faces. We do what we do and know the penalties we face; this ought to tell somebody something of one plant.

On days when I discourage not by the movement but by the politicians I ponder “To weed or not to weed?” and its places like Big Sky, Mt. that tell me “To weed forever”.

California Assemblyman Wants To Let Cities Control Medical Marijuana

closed medical marijuana dispensary

Bill lets Calif. cities control medical marijuana

The state Assembly has voted to give more power to California cities to regulate medical marijuana according to AP reports.

Democratic state Assemblyman Bob Blumenfield says claims confusion over who has final authority over medical marijuana dispensaries has led to higher crime and illegal sales, although their is no statistics to back up these claims. Assemblyman Blumenfield also happens to be from Los Angelas, which has spent most of the last year closing dispensaries through local regulation.

Marijuana & Fist

This bill could be very harmful, as it gives local government the ability to close dispensaries, which could send patients to the streets to find their medicine of choice.

Democratic Assemblyman and medical marijuana supporter Tom Ammiano of San Francisco objected saying he wanted the bill to include the term “dispensaries.” His logic was to help legitimize dispensaries which have been often the target of federal raids.

AB1300 was introduced with the intent let cities and other local governments make decisions about how to best regulate medical marijuana. Locations, crime prevention policy, licensing, taxation, hours and other rules related to the regulation of medical marijuana would be regulated locally. The bill was approved 53-1 Friday and now goes to the Senate.

Here is a copy of the bill.

List of Medical Marijuana Doctors

So, a lot of you have been asking us where to go to get your medical marijuana recommendation (both new & renewed). There are doctor’s offices popping up all over the place with recommendation prices from $40 to $150, so you need to make sure you do your homework. There are also a lot of scams with people pretending to be doctors and forging medical marijuana recommendations.

Here’s a list of all the doctor’s that are registered on NORML’s website for Orange County

Costa Mesa
Cali Green Rx
Dr. Abel Quesada
(877) 387-CGRX (2479)
440 Fair Ave.
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
www.caligreenrx.com
Map
Go Green Medical Evaluations
Dr. Marshall Salkin
(888) 420-RELIEF (7354)
129 Cabrillo Suite 205
Costa Mesa, CA 92627
Map
Costa Mesa 420 Evaluations
Dr. Marc Rose
(949) 200-9843
779 West 19th St. Suite S
Costa Mesa, CA 92627
www.cm420evals.com
Map
Dana Point
Medical Marijuana of Orange County
Dr. Bob Blake
1 (888) 215-HERB
28 Monarch Bay Plaza Suite L
Dana Point, CA 92629
www.mmofoc.com
Map
CC for Wellness
Dr. Austin Elguindy
(877) CCW-4201
Dana Point, CA
www.cc4wellness.com
Map
Huntington Beach
Compassionate Cannabis Care
Dr. Thomas Powers
(866) 238-9874
16511 Goldenwest St. Suite 105
Huntington Beach, CA 92647
Map
Beach Medical Center
Dr. Aury Lor Holtzman
(714) 375-4745
17822 Beach Blvd. Suite 330
Huntington Beach, CA 92647
www.mybuddrh.com
Map
Irvine
Medical Cannabis of Southern California
Dr. Sean Breen, (D.O.)
(877) 721-0047
17910 Sky Park Circle Suite 108
Irvine, CA 92614
www.MCSoCal.com
Map
Mission Viejo
Orange County Medical Marijuana Evaluation Service
Dr. Alan B. Ross
(800) 259-3619
26302 La Paz Suite 103
Mission Viejo, CA 92691
Map
Santa Ana
Marijuana Medicine Evaluation Centers (MMEC)
Dr. Kien Tran
(800) 268-4420
1125 E. 17th Street Suite W237
Santa Ana, CA 92701
www.marijuanamedicine.com
Map
Tustin
Dr. W. Robert Crumpton
(714) 669-4466
14642 Newport Ave. Suite 200
Tustin, CA 92780
www.cannabisdocofoc.com
Map

Next we’ve copied NORML’s list of doctor’s in Los Angeles:

City of Industry
Marijuana Medicine Evaluation Centers (MMEC)
Dr. Kien Tran
(800) 268-4420
13200 Crossroads Parkway North Suite 430
City of Industry, CA 91746
www.marijuanamedicine.com
Map
Claremont
Madison Burbank Medical Center
(909) 626-9131
678 S. Indian Hill Blvd. Suite 302
Claremont, CA 91711
www.medicaluseonly.com
Map
La Puente
Total Health Care Clinic
Dr. Daniel K. Cham
(877) 420-3338
13050 E Valley Blvd. Suite 202
La Puente , CA 91746
www.THCclinic.com
Map
Lawndale
Marijuana Medicine Evaluation Centers (MMEC)
Dr. Kien Tran
(800) 268-4420
15901 Hawthorne Blvd. Suite 460
Lawndale, CA 90260
www.marijuanamedicine.com
Map
Long Beach
CC for Wellness
Dr. Austin Elguindy
(877) CCW-4201
110 W Ocean Blvd. Suite 805
Long Beach, CA 90802
www.cc4wellness.com
Map
Education and Evaluation Center for Medical Marijuana
Dr. S. Myron Goldstein
(562) 427-6632
2880 Atlantic Suite 190
Long Beach, CA 90806
Map
Alternative Medical Consulting
Dr. Tom Zaharakis
(877) 215-4123
Long Beach, CA
www.18772154123.com
Map
Medical Cannabis of Southern California
Dr. Sean Breen, (D.O.)
(877) 721-0047
1777 N. Bellflower Blvd. Suite 212
Long Beach, CA 90815
www.MCSoCal.com
Map
Los Angeles
Dr. William Eidelman
(323) 463-3295
1654 N. Cahuenga Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028
www.dreidelman.com
Map
Dr. Bob Blake
(888) 215-HERB
1700 Westwood Blvd. Suite 201
Los Angeles, CA 90024
www.1888215HERB.com
Map
Dr. Anna Gravich
(323) 954-0231
425 S. Fairfax Ave. Suite 302
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Map
420 Evaluation Center
Dr. Louetta Westphal
213-353-6100
2010 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 710
Los Angeles, CA 90057
www.420center.com
Map
Total Health Care Clinic
Dr. Daniel K. Cham
(877) 420-3338
8001 Irvine Center Drive Suite 400
Los Angeles, CA
www.THCclinic.com
Map
Total Health Care Clinic
Dr. Daniel K. Cham
(877) 420-3338
11400 W. Olympic Ave. Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90064
www.THCclinic.com
Map
Dr. Sona Patel
(888) 436-2420
4964 Melrose Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90029
www.SonaPatelMDInc.com
Open daily 12-7
Map
Dr. Sona Patel
(888) 436-2420
314 W. Florence Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90003
www.SonaPatelMDInc.com
Open daily 12-7
Map
The Holistic Clinic
(888) 420-2546
818 N. Spring Street Suite 301
Los Angeles, CA 90012
www.my420clinic.com
Map
Medical Advisory Center
(323) 965-0420
4221 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 170-15
Los Angeles, CA 90010
www.420MAC.com
Map
Medimar
Dr. Kenneth Johnson
(877) 627-1644
404 West 7th St. Suite 1406
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Map
Marina Del Rey
GreenBridge Medical Services
Dr. Allan Frankel
(310) 821-9600
3007 Washington Blvd. Suite 110
Marina Del Rey, CA 90292
www.greenbridgemed.com
Map
North Hills
Compassionate Care Consultants
Dr. Bruce P. Hector
(818) 894-4200
8660 Woodley Ave. Suite 107
North Hills, CA 91343
www.sb420doctor.com
Map
North Hollywood
Organic Medirex Consultations
Dr. Katharine Durso
(818) 505-8805
11335 Magnolia Blvd. Suite 2D
North Hollywood, Ca 91601
www.organicmc.com
Map
Northridge
Natural Care for Wellness
Dr. Cristal Speller
(818) 701-0420
8349 Reseda Blvd. Suite 111
Northridge, 91324
www.naturalcare4wellness.com
Map
Palmdale
Natural Care for Wellness
Dr. Cristal Speller
(310) 975-5832
38345 30th St. East
Palmdale, CA 93550
www.naturalcare4wellness.com
Map
Garrison Family Medical Group
Dr. Ric S. Garrison
(661) 947-7100
41210 11th St. West Suite A
Palmdale, CA 93551
Map
Pasadena
Dr. Roger Barnes
(626) 344-7596
50 N. Mentor Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91106
www.pasadenamarijuanaevaluations.com
Map
Santa Monica
Dr. Christine Paoletti
(310) 319-6116
1304-15th St. Suite 405
Santa Monica, CA 90404
www.cannadvise.com
Map
Sherman Oaks
Aldridge Medical, Inc.
Dr. Sean Aldridge
(818) 386-1273
4898 Van Nuys Blvd. Suite 204
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403
Map
Alternative Medical Consulting
Dr. Tom Zaharakis
(877) 215-4123
13371 Ventura Blvd.
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
www.18772154123.com
Map
Silver Lake
CC for Wellness
Dr. Austin Elguindy
(877) CCW-4201
2815 W. Sunset Blvd. Suite 107
Silver Lake, CA 90026
www.cc4wellness.com
Map
Whittier
The Holistic Clinic
(888) 420-2546
11454 Whittier Blvd.
Whittier, CA 90601
www.my420clinic.com
Map
Dr. Sona Patel
(888) 436-2420
7007 Washington Ave.
Whittier, CA 90601
www.SonaPatelMDInc.com
Open daily 12-7
Map
Woodland Hills
Marijuana Medicine Evaluation Centers (MMEC)
Dr. Kien Tran
(800) 268-4420
20350 Ventura Blvd. Suite 240
Woodland Hills, CA 91364
www.marijuanamedicine.com
Map
Blue Mountain Medical
Dr. Stuart Kramer
(818) 716-5179
19730 Ventura Blvd. Suite 104
Woodland Hills, CA 91364
Map

Hopefully these lists will help you guys find a decent medical marijuana friendly doctor. Don’t forget to bring any and all prescriptions, doctor notes, health exams, and other things that will help prove your case. Also do your research! Google these doctors and any other doctors you find. If you’re looking for a doctor not in Orange County or Los Angeles here is the link where we found these lists http://listings.canorml.org/physicians/listings.lasso

After you get your doctor’s recommendation don’t forget to come see us to pick up all of your meds, we’re at 24601 Raymond Way, Suite 9B. Lake Forest, CA 92656.

Have a great day!

Judge Orders Cops To Return Two Pounds of Marijuana

2553140113_1b8e6320ae.jpeg
Photo: ndboy

A judge on Thursday ordered the California Highway Patrol to return two pounds of marijuana seized during an arrest in August 2010.

Sacramento Superior Court Judge John Spaunor ordered the police to return the personal property of Kevin Smith (not the famous movie director) of Sacramento after the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office dismissed DUI and marijuana possession charges against him, reports Tom DuHain of KCRA.

Charges were dismissed in March after experts agreed that Smith did not have sufficient THC in his bloodstream to cause impairment, according to defense attorney Alex Veylupek.

Smith has a rare medical condition that caused him to black out behind the wheel as he was driving on Fair Oaks Boulevard last year, according to Veylupek. Smith also has a doctor’s authorization for up to three pounds of medical marijuana, the attorney said.

In court on Thursday morning, the judge asked members of the D.A.’s staff if they had an opinion about returning the marijuana. Veylupek said he objected to them being asked, rightly pointing out that the D.A. no longer had standing in the case, since charges were dropped.

The ruling is good news for patients who need to transport their medical marijuana, according to Ryan Landers, a member of the Compassionate Coalition, a medical marijuana advocacy group in Sacramento.

“I’m glad the judge followed the law and applied it accordingly and that he took the time to look into the truth,” Landers said.

A Tribute To The Most Awesome Grow House Ever Made (Pictures inside)

Could a house be any more awesome? It’s a shame these good folks got busted, such a waste of an perfect house. What are the new owners going to grow there, tomatoes?

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