Posts Tagged ‘chronic’

Why Synthetic Cannabis Is Stupid

Breaking news out of Australia, specifically Joondalup, reports that five  people were hospitalized after inhaling a new form of Kronic, the most popular synthetic marijuana available (or not available–depending on the country). We’ve warned you about this before, but now I have to tell you again with more of an emphasis on just how idiotic these synthetic compounds are. STOP SMOKING IT! There’s more chastising to come after the break because if five random people in Australia had been HMJ readers or had friends that read it, they would have avoided a miserable trip to the hospital.

If you’re unfamiliar with my obvious disdain for these cheap (AND LEGAL!) offshoots of our beloved marijuana, then you can read these posts. Or read this, and bang your head against the wall for being a sycophantic tool vulnerable to the whims and fancies of the most diabolical of species: the ad-copy writer:

The Auckland-based manufacturing company believed to be importing the product into Australia describes the product on its website as ‘the height of innovation’ and that the new Kronic was developed ‘in response to demand.’

‘Containing no banned substances, the latest in our line of premium home-grown smoking blends will deliver you a smooth, haze-filled blaze,’ it reads.

Which is utter horseshit. The same type of horseshit that all manufacturers of synthetic products espouse so you’ll buy their product and they can make money off your lemmings-based consumerism. Conspicuous idiocy more than showing off the hip, new drug available. FourLoko is one thing, but this shit just isn’t right.

If you’re smoking this hooey because real marijuana is illegal, then you need to start thinking a little bit about synthetic vs. organic. Marijuana buds come from the ground. If you’re religious, you could say God created marijuana. If you’re a vegan or a tree-hugger, you could say Mother Nature created herb. If you’re a secular anarchist, you could say fuck “the man” and smoke REAL marijuana to do just that (it’s still prohibited on a federal level).  Regardless, don’t mess with the crappy man-made shit. Man made war, and strife and all the shit. We’ve fucked our planet up, but our abused world still grows delicious herb without our prodding. Man-made idrugs always lose.

Smoke marijuana instead of its followers. No one is going to the hospital for that. If you get sick or die from synthetic marijuana you’ve lost all my sympathy. I’ve warned you enough. Now call all your buddies in Australia and tell them the same.

I’d rather go blind then smoke that crap.

http://www.hailmaryjane.com

Alameda Sheriffs Raid Paraplegic Patients Garden and Threaten To Kill His Dog

Jason ‘RoLLaJaY’ Rivera (center in wheelchair)

Image via Examiner

I was fortunate to meet Jason Rivera aka RoLLaJaY at the SF Medical Cannabis Cup, and my heart goes out to him during time of trouble. No medical marijuana patient should have to go through torment of having their medicine raided let alone be threatened with the killing of their dog! This past Thursday, Alameda County Sheriffs said they acted on an ‘anonymous tip’ when they executed the warrant on Jason’s studio.

As sheriffs executed the warrant at the studio, one asked Rivera about searching his home.  Rivera says the deputy threatened to kill his dog if he didn’t cooperate.  “We can do this the easy way and you can take us to your house to look around,” Rivera recounts the deputy saying, “or we can detain you for six hours while we get a warrant and go to your house and shoot your dog.”

This is an absurd misuse of power, and I think Russ Belville really hit the nail on the head when he said: “This threat is nothing more than emotional terrorism by our domestic police force to trample a disabled man’s Fourth Amendment rights in a crusade over a plant.”

The threatening or killing of family pets isn’t a new tactic for law enforcement during these types of raids, one example being the video from a raid in Columbia, MO in which a man’s dog was shot seven times. It sickens me deeply to know that the people appointed to protect us are the ones dealing the damage, we need to really make our voices heard in this fight for legalization in hopes of keeping harmless patients and medical marijuana providers safe.

Guerilla Union Is Way More Then Just A Concert Promotion Organization

Guerilla Union

By Alex Distefano

Formed in 1998, Guerilla Union began as a concert promotion company, but it has since evolved into much more. The company is the driving force behind such massive hip-hop events as Spring Gathering, Rock the Bells, Paid Dues and Cypress Hill’s Smokeout. Guerilla Union has also ventured into the world of fashion, technology, media, independent art and medicinal marijuana advocacy, proving that hard work combined with a DIY grassroots ethic can lead to success in multiple arenas, Guerilla Union founder Chang Weisberg recently spoke with CULTURE about the lineup for the 8th annual Rock the Bells, his passion for hip-hop music in a live setting, his promotion work and his latest take on marijuana.

 

Tell readers the origins of Guerilla Union.

Well, at first it was all about concert promoting. I’ve been doing it with a lot of cool people for many years. It involved putting together concerts featuring all kinds of music, and we also dealt with clothing and merchandise. In ’98, we formed [Guerilla Union]; and subsequently it was the same year that we started the Cypress Hill Smokeout festival. Now we are involved in tons; from the Dragon Fest to Paid Dues—an independent hip-hop festival—and, of course, Rock the Bells, which is huge. It took a lot of hard work, but it’s definitely paid off. We’re just happy to be one of the most recognized promoters in the U.S, with the magnitude of work we do . . . But we just took what Lollapalooza was doing to the next level and kept it going. I love what Perry Farrell did, and I look up to him. We are fortunate to work with such great artists like Cypress Hill and Snoop Dogg and many more.

 

Tell us about this year’s Rock the Bells. Can you give us the scoop on any surprise guests?

Well this year we have another amazing show. I think there are 10 records being performed in their entirety, which is always cool. I’m looking forward to all of them really; Nas doing Illmatic and Lauren Hill performing the Miseducation album; Cypress Hill’s Black Sunday. And in particular, I’m looking forward to seeing Mobb Deep play The Infamous and Souls of Mischief play 93 ’Til Infinity.Those are a little more obscure, but that’s just my opinion.

Spring Gathering 2011

Tell readers about the recent Spring Gathering Music Festival and Medical Marijuana Expo in San Bernardino. Did you encounter any problems with law enforcement?

It was different in that people with doctor’s notes could legally use marijuana at the show . . . There were no incidents at the concert. This type thing would not have happened two years ago.

 

I heard that you have a NorCal medical marijuana and music event planned for the future. Can you tell us more?

We are currently making the plans to hold two events in the next 12 months up north. The first one will be in the Bay Area this fall. It’s not solidified yet, but its well on its way. This is something we’re very excited about as well; and Northern California is so much further ahead with the acceptance of medical marijuana and use in general, so we’re going to set our sights high.

www.guerillaunion.com

 

Guerilla Warfare

Guerilla Union head honcho Chang Weisberg isn’t shy about his canna-activist views. The more-than-a-concert-promoter maintains that the medical marijuana movement will eventually lead to full legalization. “We are in prohibition now, just as was once the case with alcohol,” he says. “But the hypocrisy is clear: alcohol and tobacco cause more of a serious health threat than marijuana ever will. These drugs kill. Yet marijuana doesn’t. But the fight goes on. Marijuana will not go away.”

 

Article from Culture Magazine and republished with special permission

Medical Marijuana And Cachexia

medical marijuana blog

You won’t have to research medical conditions treatable with medical marijuana for very long before you come across the term cachexia; if you’re not sure what this term means, you’re not alone so here we’ll explain exactly what cachexia is and how cannabis can help to alleviate it.

What is Cachexia?

This definition from the National Cancer Institute:

cachexia (ka-KEK-see-a)

Loss of body weight and muscle mass, and weakness that may occur in patients with cancer, AIDS, or other chronic diseases.

Cachexia invariably occurs with anorexia:

anorexia (a-nuh-REK-see-uh)

An abnormal loss of the appetite for food. Anorexia can be caused by cancer, AIDS, a mental disorder (i.e., anorexia nervosa), or other diseases.

What Causes Cachexia?

Although it depends very much on what type of cancer a patient has, it’s estimated that 50% to 80% of all cancer patients will develop cachexia, usually during the final stages of pancreatic, lung, and prostate cancers. The condition appears to result from the immune system’s response to the tumor.

Another major cause of cachexia is HIV/AIDS infection.

Cachexia Treatments

In most cases the standard for advanced cachexia is intravenous feeding, together with administration of an appetite stimulant drug – Megace. The problem with Megace is that the weight gain it stimulates is in the form of fat; the weight loss through the cachexia is lean tissue – muscles, heart tissue and the like.

dank nugget

Marijuana and Cachexia

Most people know about the way weed stimulates the appetite – the infamous munchies. The munchies is caused by the action of THC on the body and there have been a number of studies confirming that patients who use medical marijuana experience a reduction in rate of weight loss together with an increase in appetite. Sadly, research has also failed to show any advantage of taking THC and Megace in combination – they do not augment each other’s effects.

Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Marijuana

It has been shown in various studies that, when used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, THC is more quickly absorbed from marijuana smoke than from any oral preparation. The only problem appears to be one of dose measurement; however, with experience, chemotherapy patients will learn to manage their weed dosage.

Courtesy of the Medical Marijuana Blog

Top 10 Cannabis Studies The Government Wishes It Didn’t Fund

10) MARIJUANA USE HAS NO EFFECT ON MORTALITY:
A massive study of California HMO members funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) found marijuana use caused no significant increase in mortality. Tobacco use was associated with increased risk of death. Sidney, S et al. Marijuana Use and Mortality. American Journal of Public Health. Vol. 87 No. 4, April 1997. p. 585-590. Sept. 2002.
9) HEAVY MARIJUANA USE AS A YOUNG ADULT WON’T RUIN YOUR LIFE:
Veterans Affairs scientists looked at whether heavy marijuana use as a young adult caused long-term problems later, studying identical twins in which one twin had been a heavy marijuana user for a year or longer but had stopped at least one month before the study, while the second twin had used marijuana no more than five times ever. Marijuana use had no significant impact on physical or mental health care utilization, health-related quality of life, or current socio-demographic characteristics. Eisen SE et al. Does Marijuana Use Have Residual Adverse Effects on Self-Reported Health Measures, Socio-Demographics or Quality of Life? A Monozygotic Co-Twin Control Study in Men. Addiction. Vol. 97 No. 9. p.1083-1086. Sept. 1997
8) THE “GATEWAY EFFECT” MAY BE A MIRAGE:
Marijuana is often called a “gateway drug” by supporters of prohibition, who point to statistical “associations” indicating that persons who use marijuana are more likely to eventually try hard drugs than those who never use marijuana – implying that marijuana use somehow causes hard drug use. But a model developed by RAND Corp. researcher Andrew Morral demonstrates that these associations can be explained “without requiring a gateway effect.” More likely, this federally funded study suggests, some people simply have an underlying propensity to try drugs, and start with what’s most readily available. Morral AR, McCaffrey D and Paddock S. Reassessing the Marijuana Gateway Effect. Addiction. December 2002. p. 1493-1504.

7) PROHIBITION DOESN’T WORK (PART I):
The White House had the National Research Council examine the data being gathered about drug use and the effects of U.S. drug policies. NRC concluded, “the nation possesses little information about the effectiveness of current drug policy, especially of drug law enforcement.” And what data exist show “little apparent relationship between severity of sanctions prescribed for drug use and prevalence or frequency of use.” In other words, there is no proof that prohibition – the cornerstone of U.S. drug policy for a century – reduces drug use. National Research Council. Informing America’s Policy on Illegal Drugs: What We Don’t Know Keeps Hurting Us. National Academy Press, 2001. p. 193.

6) PROHIBITION DOESN’T WORK (PART II):
(DOES PROHIBITION CAUSE THE “GATEWAY EFFECT”?): U.S. and Dutch researchers, supported in part by NIDA, compared marijuana users in San Francisco, where non-medical use remains illegal, to Amsterdam, where adults may possess and purchase small amounts of marijuana from regulated businesses. Looking at such parameters as frequency and quantity of use and age at onset of use, they found no differences except one: Lifetime use of hard drugs was significantly lower in Amsterdam, with its “tolerant” marijuana policies. For example, lifetime crack cocaine use was 4.5 times higher in San Francisco than Amsterdam. Reinarman, C, Cohen, PDA, and Kaal, HL. The Limited Relevance of Drug Policy: Cannabis in Amsterdam and San Francisco. American Journal of Public Health. Vol. 94, No. 5. May 2004. p. 836-842.

5) OOPS, MARIJUANA MAY PREVENT CANCER (PART I):
Federal researchers implanted several types of cancer, including leukemia and lung cancers, in mice, then treated them with cannabinoids (unique, active components found in marijuana). THC and other cannabinoids shrank tumors and increased the mice’s lifespans. Munson, AE et al. Antineoplastic Activity of Cannabinoids. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Sept. 1975. p. 597-602.

4) OOPS, MARIJUANA MAY PREVENT CANCER, (PART II):
In a 1994 study the government tried to suppress, federal researchers gave mice and rats massive doses of THC, looking for cancers or other signs of toxicity. The rodents given THC lived longer and had fewer cancers, “in a dose-dependent manner” (i.e. the more THC they got, the fewer tumors). NTP Technical Report On The Toxicology And Carcinogenesis Studies Of 1-Trans- Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, CAS No. 1972-08-3, In F344/N Rats And B6C3F Mice, Gavage Studies. See also, “Medical Marijuana: Unpublished Federal Study Found THC-Treated Rats Lived Longer, Had Less Cancer,” AIDS Treatment News no. 263, Jan. 17, 1997.

3) OOPS, MARIJUANA MAY PREVENT CANCER (PART III):
Researchers at the Kaiser-Permanente HMO, funded by NIDA, followed 65,000 patients for nearly a decade, comparing cancer rates among non-smokers, tobacco smokers, and marijuana smokers. Tobacco smokers had massively higher rates of lung cancer and other cancers. Marijuana smokers who didn’t also use tobacco had no increase in risk of tobacco-related cancers or of cancer risk overall. In fact their rates of lung and most other cancers were slightly lower than non-smokers, though the difference did not reach statistical significance. Sidney, S. et al. Marijuana Use and Cancer Incidence (California, United States). Cancer Causes and Control. Vol. 8. Sept. 1997, p. 722-728.

2) OOPS, MARIJUANA MAY PREVENT CANCER (PART IV):
Donald Tashkin, a UCLA researcher whose work is funded by NIDA, did a case-control study comparing 1,200 patients with lung, head and neck cancers to a matched group with no cancer. Even the heaviest marijuana smokers had no increased risk of cancer, and had somewhat lower cancer risk than non-smokers (tobacco smokers had a 20-fold increased lung cancer risk). Tashkin D. Marijuana Use and Lung Cancer: Results of a Case-Control Study. American Thoracic Society International Conference. May 23, 2006.

1) MARIJUANA DOES HAVE MEDICAL VALUE:
In response to passage of California’s medical marijuana law, the White House had the Institute of Medicine (IOM) review the data on marijuana’s medical benefits and risks. The IOM concluded, “Nausea, appetite loss, pain and anxiety are all afflictions of wasting, and all can be mitigated by marijuana.” While noting potential risks of smoking, the report added, “we acknowledge that there is no clear alternative for people suffering from chronic conditions that might be relieved by smoking marijuana, such as pain or AIDS wasting.” The government’s refusal to acknowledge this finding caused co-author John A. Benson to tell the New York Times that the government “loves to ignore our report … they would rather it never happened.” Joy, JE, Watson, SJ, and Benson, JA. Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base. National Academy Press. 1999. p. 159. See also, Harris, G. FDA Dismisses Medical Benefit From Marijuana. New York Times. Apr.
21, 2006

Song of the Day: Pass The Dutchie

This generation
Rules the nation
With version

Music happen to be the food of love
Sounds to really make you rub and scrub

I say: Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
It a gonna burn, give me music make me jump and prance
It a go done, give me the music make me rock in the dance

It was a cool and lovely breezy afternoon
(How does it feel when you’ve got no food ?)
You could feel it ’cause it was the month of June
(How does it feel when you’ve got no food ?)
So I left my gate and went out for a walk
(How does it feel when you’ve got no food ?)
As I pass the dreadlocks’ camp I heard them say
(How does it feel when you’ve got no food ?)

Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
It a gonna burn, give me music make me jump and prance
It a go done, give me the music make me rock in the dance

So I stopped to find out what was going on.
(How does it feel when you’ve got no food ?)
‘Cause the spirit of Jah, you know he leads you on
(How does it feel when you’ve got no food ?)
There was a ring of dreads and a session was there in swing
(How does it feel when you’ve got no food ?)
You could feel the chill as I seen and heard them say
(How does it feel when you’ve got no food ?)

Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
It a gonna burn, give me music make me jump and prance
It a go done, give me the music make me rock in the dance

‘Cause me say listen to the drummer, me say listen to the bass
Give me little music make me wind up me waist
Me say listen to the drummer, me say listen to the bass
Give me little music make me wind up me waist, I say

Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
It a gonna burn, give me music make me jump and prance
It a go done, give me the music make me rock in the dance

You play it on the radio, a so me say, we a go hear it on the stereo
A so me know you a go play it on the disco
A so me say we a go hear it on the stereo

Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
Pass the Dutchie on the left hand side
It a gonna burn, give me music make me jump and prance
It a go done, give me the music make me rock in the dance

I say east, say west, say north and south (on the left hand side)
This is gonna make us jump and shout (on the left hand side)

Medical Marijuana Ads Help Dying Industry

Ads for pot face fewer regulations than ads for cigarettes and booze

By Anna Rendall, SF Public Press

Medical marijuana advertising is taking off, propping up the fortunes of ailing media companies that have seen income from other business sectors plummet in the recession.

Advertisements offering free edibles for new patients and products such as “super silver haze” are helping to keep the San Francisco Bay Guardian, SF Weekly and East Bay Express in business. Similar ads have even started cropping up — tentatively — in more staid publications, such as the San Francisco Chronicle.

Ads for pot are growing so fast in part because they face fewer regulations and restrictions than marketing materials for cigarettes and alcohol. The only real regulation is one requiring the ads to warn customers that they need a doctor’s recommendation.

“Marijuana advertising is a small percentage of our total advertising — we wish that we had more,” said Mina Bajraktarevic, advertising sales manager at the Bay Guardian, whose back page has become a wall of green with medical marijuana advertising.

“We’ve been involved in this for years,” said Bruce Brugmann, publisher of the Bay Guardian. “We haven’t heard    any complaints.”

Not all media companies are comfortable with pot ads, and some have equivocated about whether to accept them. Some advertisers were waiting to see the outcome of the vote Nov. 2 on Proposition 19, the state pot legalization bill, before agreeing to take money from the burgeoning industry.

Ten years ago most medical cannabis clubs were intentionally low-key and relied only on word of mouth. Being illegal, they were inconsistently tolerated by the authorities.

Now, with rapidly liberalized enforcement policies, the most successful medical cannabis businesses are the ones that get their brand name out to the public. Dozens of the businesses are racing to capture the pot-smoking community’s mindshare, and are pumping hundreds of thousands of dollars into local media this year to do so.

“We probably spend around $2,500 to $3,000 a month on advertising,” said Kevin Reed, president of the Green Cross, a medical cannabis dispensary on Market Street between Eighth and Ninth streets. “We’re in a world where you’re competing with all these fly-by-night businesses who don’t have to follow the rules — they’re not regulated.” Until recently, more than half a dozen dispensaries had failed to register their businesses with the San Francisco Department of Public Health.

One of the pioneers of pot advertising was KUSF Radio. Four years ago, the station, run by the University of San Francisco, had a Green Cross-underwritten public-service announcement that ran on 90.3 FM.

Money and Weed

But sometimes it’s hard for pot clubs to buy ads; several have lined up ad agreements only to have them retroactively rejected.

In May, Facebook canceled the Green Cross’ existing advertisements on the site. MediCann, a group of clinics specializing in medical marijuana evaluations, also had its Facebook ads snuffed.

In August, the Green Cross paid in full for a slot on a huge electronic billboard on Interstate 280 at the Serramonte Shopping Center in Daly City — only to see it taken down a day later.

The circumstances surrounding that reversal were not quite clear. SF Weekly ran a blog post suggesting the ad was taken down because its content was objectionable. But a spokeswoman for the mall, Cherie Napier, said that the real reason was that the billboard was only permitted to run ads for products or services sold at the mall. The marijuana ad, she said in an e-mail, “would have been a violation and could have resulted in a $10,000 fine from the state.”

Aside from the weeklies, the medical pot business supports a whole genre of “cannabis friendly” magazines, such as West Coast Leaf and Kush.

“We don’t do general newspapers or anything like that,” said Adrian Moore, director of operations at 7 Stars Holistic Healing Center in Richmond.

Bigger news outlets don’t appear ready to take advertisements for marijuana, at least not yet.

To what extent can marijuana be advertised? Kris Hermes, executive director of the Oakland-based Americans for Safe Access, called advertising for the drug a First Amendment issue.

“Our rough position is that we’re in favor of patients finding out how to access medical marijuana,” Hermes said. “We encourage local governments to figure out ways of allowing advertisements that aren’t counterproductive to [get to] the members of the community.”

Source: The Bay Citizen (http://s.tt/129t2)

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