Posts Tagged ‘lake forest dispensary’

Ron Paul & Hemp for American Farmers:energy efficiency grants

Energy audit [Economist articles in description – Ron Paul mentioned in one] A video consisting of an US Government history lesson about hemp which leads into an argument for hemp and then Ron Paul’s Hemp legislation. Hemp has the potential to be a huge boon for American farmers and the US economy all while helping the environment and improving US security by lowering our reliance on foreign oil…and Ron Paul is the only candidate in favor of legislation to allow American Farmers to grow it. Music Artist – The Whitest Boy Alive Song – Golden Cage (Economist – 6/23/07) Nowadays farmers are banned from growing hemp without a permit from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), which usually refuses to grant one. So many hemp products in America—food, lotions, clothing, paper and so forth—are imported from China or Canada, where farmers have been allowed to grow hemp commercially since 1998. Hemp grows so easily that few pesticides or even fertilisers are needed. “Feral” hemp is said to grow by the roadside in Iowa and Nebraska. Barbara Filippone, owner of a hemp fabric company called Enviro Textiles, says demand has rocketed—sales are growing by 35% a year. Nutiva, a California-based hemp company that sells hemp bars, shakes and oils, saw sales rise from under $1m three years ago to $4.5m last year. “Hemp is the next soy,” predicts John Roulac, Nutiva’s founder. American farmers would love to grow hemp. North Dakota, which in 1999 became the first state to allow industrial hemp energy saving

 

CURED OF CANCER

Cafe Vale Tudo New Prop 215 Flowers Video

Our new yummy strains!
Come in to check them out at Cafe Vale Tudo
24601 Raymond Way, Suite 9B
Lake Forest, Ca
92630

(949) 454-9227

Open 10 am to 10 pm, 7 days a week

A Bill that would take Marijuana off the controlled substances list.

cannabis Washington, D.C. — When the smoke clears, it may be remembered as a rare moment of political unity in Washington. House of Representatives Democrat Barney Frank and conservative Republican libertarian Ron Paul joined forces to introduce a bill that would take marijuana off the government’s list of controlled substances and eliminate criminal penalties. “Criminally prosecuting adults for making the choice to smoke marijuana is a waste of law enforcement resources and an intrusion on personal freedom,” Frank said in a statement on Thursday. “I do not advocate urging people to smoke marijuana, neither do I urge them to drink alcoholic beverages or smoke tobacco, but in none of these cases do I think prohibition enforced by criminal sanctions is good public policy,” Frank said. The move comes a day after U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton returned from Guatemala and Jamaica on a trip aimed at injecting more funds and logistical support into American efforts to fight drug-trafficking. Critics argue U.S. attempts to beat back the drug trade have been costly and ineffective. According to the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the government spent about $15.1 billion on the fight against drug trafficking in fiscal year 2010, up from $14.8 billion in fiscal 2009. Marijuana is the most widely used illegal drug in the United States, with an estimated 11.5 million current users, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. At least one-third of the U.S. population has used marijuana sometime in their lives, and most of that marijuana was smuggled in from Mexico and other parts of Latin America, the DEA said. The Global Commission on Drug Policy, a high-level international commission, earlier this month declared the global “war on drugs” a failure and urged nations to consider legalizing cannabis and other drugs to undermine organized crime and protect their citizens’ health. But Clinton says progress in Colombia, where drug violence is down sharply, as a model. “Our experience in Colombia has shown what proactive investments and committed partnership can do,” Clinton said in Guatemala on Wednesday.

Editing by Jackie Frank

Source: Reuters (Wire)

Author: Pedro Nicolaci da Costa

Published: June 24, 2011

Copyright: 2011

Thomson Reuters

swat team storms home over 2oz of MMJ

By Steve Elliott ~alapoet~ in Medical, News
Friday, June 17, 2011, at 9:20 am
Share220
swat-team1.jpeg
Photo: FARK

​Twenty police officers, some in masks and riot gear, stormed an Arizona home last week after receiving a tip that the owner was in possession of an ounce of marijuana.

The homeowner, Ross Taylor, is a legal, card-carrying patient under the state’s new medical marijuana law, and is therefore allowed to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis, reports Ray Stern at Phoenix New Times. Taylor is also the owner of Cannabis Patient Screening Centers, a new company that matches up patients with doctors for medical marijuana recommendations.

The aggressive cops handcuffed Taylor and his wife, served a search warrant on the home and found a grand total of two ounces of marijuana and a small amount of hashish, which is concentrated cannabis.
cannabis patient screening logo.jpeg
Graphic: Phoenix New Times
Surprise, surprise: The guy who got raided (for no good reason) also owns a company which matches up medical marijuana patients with recommending doctors. Of course, the cops claim they didn’t know that. And why would they?
​The over-enthusiastic porkers seized the marijuana and some paraphernalia from an upstairs closet, even though the total weight was under the legal threshold, then informed Taylor he’d “likely be hearing from the prosecutor’s office” about criminal charges.
Sgt. Bill Balafas, acting as spokesman for the Gilbert Police Department, claimed that because Taylor bought the pot from another person, as opposed to growing it himself, his possession of it wasn’t legal despite his status as a patient.
“People are being harassed,” said Taylor. “They want political control.”
Police claim they had no idea that Taylor owned a medical marijuana-related company, nor that he had a valid registration card. Does this mean that they’ll feel free to come swarming in as a low-IQ SWAT team and knock down the doors of any patient without even checking first?
“That’s the first problem, as we see it,” Stern wrote. “Cops went through the trouble of drafting a search warrant and having it signed by a judge, but apparently didn’t bother to check in with the state Department of Health Services to find out if Taylor was in the patient registry, which he was.”
Exactly what good it does having a patient registry when half-wit cops refuse to check the damn thing before going all Rambo on seriously ill medical marijuana users would appear to be a valid question at this point.
The raiding cops cut Taylor’s power and water to his home just prior to the raid, presumably to stop anyone from flushing the pot or sending it down the disposal.
They knocked and “screamed” they had a search warrant, according to Taylor, so he let them in.
The excitable drug warriors even handcuffed three employees of All My Sons Moving and Storage, who were in the process of helping Taylor move into his new home. The cops, some with shields and holding shotguns, announced they were “with the SWAT team” and detained the innocent movers for about an hour, according to Kevin Anderson, manager of All My Sons.
Taylor, meanwhile, showed the cops his medical marijuana card. One of the masked, hostile, evidently not-very-damn-intelligent officers told him, “I don’t even know if you’re supposed to have this card,” and referred to the Gov. Jan Brewer’s lawsuit against the new law.
Of course, don’t hold your breath expecting clueless Gov. Brewer, who wouldn’t know leadership if it bit her on her wrinkled ass, to accept any responsibility for encouraging rogue actions like this against suffering patients.
Taylor told the officers he’d bought the pot from another qualified patient, and they told him that meant his weed wasn’t legal. During the raid, police claimed they called the state health department and were told that patients “cannot legally buy from anyone else,” according to Balafas.
Balafas did not know the name of the DHS representative to whom the officers talked. Laura Oxley, spokeswoman for the DHS, was also unable to provide a name.
The official Arizona DHS website answers the question, “Where can I legally buy marijuana if I am a qualifying patient?” thusly:
“Qualifying patients can obtain medical marijuana from a dispensary, the qualifying patient’s designated caregiver, another qualifying patient, or, if authorized to cultivate, from home cultivation.” [Emphasis added.]
Balafas also claimed the hashish wasn’t legal under Arizona’s medical law, which would be interesting, since hashish is nothing more than concentrated marijuana.
“If so, it would be nothing less than a loophole for cops to bust qualified patients who have converted pot plants into a more concentrated form,” Stern writes in New Times.
“Maybe this was their way of saying ‘Welcome to Gilbert,’ ” Taylor said of the police raid.

An Ounce Or A Pound? Marijuana Decrim Stymies Searches

Thumbnail image for police.dog.drug.detection.jpeg
Photo: Excel K-9 Services, Inc.
Cops can’t tell by smell alone whether you have an ounce or multiple pounds of weed.
Neither can police dogs.
​ ​(A recent Massachusetts case has brought attention to the growing haze of confusion around the state’s marijuana laws, as one high-profile case was thrown out when a judge said police cannot tell by smell alone whether an ounce or multiple pounds of pot are present. One ounce and under, of course, has been decriminalized in the state.)
Repercussions from the case may mean that police are wasting their time using drug-sniffing dogs as the basis for pot arrests, according to an opinion piece from GateHouse News Service.
In the Route 3 case, state police said they smelled marijuana on the breath of two passengers in the back seat of a taxi that had been stopped in Hingham for a broken license plate light.
When the officers then let a police drug dog sniff the vehicle, the animal signaled that it smelled drugs in the trunk of the taxi. When it was opened, a suitcase containing 13.5 pounds of marijuana was found.
The passengers, from Watertown and Falmouth, were arrested, but questions arose about whether police had probable cause to conduct the search.
An April ruling by the state Supreme Judicial Court prohibits police from searching a vehicle solely because they smell marijuana. Massachusetts voters in 2008 made possession of one ounce or less of marijuana a civil infraction and not a crime.
The court wrote that police cannot discern by smell alone whether someone has more than an ounce of marijuana.
Marijuana activists say the ruling should apply to drug dogs, too, and legal experts are unsure how the issue will be resolved.

Police Seize 1,500 Grams of Marijuana Hidden In Cornbread (7 Photos)

Police seized 30 weapons, 20 bottles of liquor and 1,500 grams of marijuana hidden in cornbread from soccer fans. Colombian police set up a checkpoint on the eastern road in the rural zone of Suan.

Marijuana Cornbread 11

Marijuana Cornbread 22

Marijuana Cornbread 33

Marijuana Cornbread 44

Marijuana Cornbread 55

Marijuana Cornbread 66

Marijuana Cornbread 77

 

%d bloggers like this: