Posts Tagged ‘marijuana blog’

Teens May Be Charged For Pot Brownie Prank

A trio of teenagers in downstate Illinois are looking at a possible criminal record after police say they baked a batch of marijuana brownies and handed them out to unknowing victims.
The O’Fallow Township High School students were attending summer band camp where the incident allegedly took place. Besides facing criminal charges, the school may also take disciplinary action, according to STLtoday.com.
O’Fallon police Sgt. Rob Schmidtke told the site, “Anytime anybody is given drugs or something else without their knowledge that can obviously be a health hazard. We won’t let this slide. It could have been a very big deal.”
Police were tipped off via a fellow student who had learned about the prank and alerted a school administrator.
Schmidtke says the three teens confessed to lacing the brownies, adding, “It could have been an interesting band practice.”
O’Fallon Police Chief John Betten told the Belleville News Democrat, “No charges have been filed at this point and the case is still under investigation,” and that fortunately there were no “reports of problems” for any of the band members that ingested the pot-laced baked goods.
“Maybe [the teens] didn’t do a very good job of making them,” he added.

Do People Smoke More Marijuana In The Summer?

I have been involved in the marijuana industry for a long, long time.  I can’t speak for all areas, or all circles, but in Oregon, there is one fact that I believe above all others in the marijuana industry – people smoke more recreational marijuana in the summer than in any other part of the year.  Feel free to disagree with me, but all Oregon veterans will tell you that their most profitable months have always been during the summer.  I believe there are a few reasons (and admittedly, no statistics) to support my claim.

During the summer months, there is so much more going on. Festivals seem to be abundant. I know I have been to almost a dozen of them so far, from the Spring Gathering in San Bernadino to the Oregon Country Fair just outside of Eugene. Every event, I made sure to have as many blunts, joints, bowls and brownies as I could, and I’m sure I wasn’t alone. I don’t know what it is about sitting on some grass listening to music with a bunch of other stoners that gets me going, but it does.

Another big event that goes on a lot during the summer that results in A LOT of marijuana consumption is camping. If you are a pothead, and you go camping, you make sure to pack a smoking device and marijuana way before you think about a tent or anything else. If I had to chose, I would sleep under the stars with a full pipe way before I would pass it up for a tent.

Another factor is that school is out, so there are a lot more people working that weren’t. I had so many classmates in high school and college that had to scrum together money for an eighth once every never during the academic year. But when they got their first paycheck from their summer job, they were smoking like a broken chimney.

Does anyone else feel the same out there in TWB land? Do you consume more marijuana during the summer, or another part of the year? Are things different in your area than what I’m talking about in Oregon? Curious minds await your responses….

 

http://www.theweedblog.com

Jail Guard Tries To Smuggle Herb To Inmate

Image via link.

What’s good homies, this story is coming from the Cook County Jail in Illinois. April 23, 2010,  32 year old Heriberto Viramontes attacked two women as they were walking home on a Bucktown sidewalk on the 1800 block of North Damen. Now on June 11th of this year, his girlfriend was arrested minutes after leaving the jail after leaving some bud taped under the table in the visitor’s room! If that wasn’t enough stupidity by one person, more people were allegedly involved, including 50 year old Jerom Prusa, the guard who allowed this all to happen. For the full story click here.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Prusia was suspended pending an employment hearing and he resigned from the LaGrange Park Police Department, where he worked as an auxiliary officer. Prusa faces a slew of charges, especially after officers also found two knives in his uniform. Both Viramontes and Lundgren were charged with one count each of bringing contraband into a penal institution.

Alright, I usually believe everyone should enjoy herb no matter what. But this guy is pretty much undeserving of the good, let alone life for the things he did. These fools are stupid and all need to rethink they’re shit. Be about that paper, not jail.

http://www.hailmaryjane.com

U.S. Can’t Justify Its Drug War Spending: New Reports

2064027165_6b83996b8d_o.jpeg
Graphic: Break The Matrix

​Name one government program that for 40 years has failed to achieve any of its goals, yet receives bigger and bigger budgets every year. If you said “the War on Drugs,” you’ve been paying attention.

The Obama Administration is unable to show that the billions of dollar spent in the War On Drugs have significantly affected the flow of illicit substances into the United States, according to two government reports and outside experts.

The reports specifically criticize the government’s growing use of U.S. contractors, which were paid more than $3 billion to train local prosecutors and police, help eradicate coca fields, and operate surveillance equipment in the battle against the expanding drug trade in Latin America over the past five years, reports Brian Bennett of the Los Angeles Times.
“We are wasting tax dollars and throwing money at a problem without even knowing what we are getting in return,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), who chairs the Senate subcommittee that wrote one of the reports, which was released on Wednesday.

col_bruce bagley flip.jpg
Photo: Colombia In Context
Professor Bruce Bagley, University of Miami:
“I think we have wasted our money hugely”
“I think we have wasted our money hugely,” said Bruce Bagley, an expert in U.S. anti-narcotics efforts. “The effort has had corrosive effects on every country it has touched,” said Bagley, who chairs international studies at the University of Miami at Coral Gables, Florida.
Predictably, Obama Administration officials deny reports that U.S. efforts have failed to reduce drug production and smuggling in Latin America.
White House officials claim the expanding U.S. anti-drug effort occupies a “growing portion” of time for President Obama’s national security team, even though it doesn’t get many Congressional hearings or headlines.
The majority of wasted American counter-narcotics dollars are awarded to five big corporations: DynCorp, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, ITT and ARINC, according to the report for the contracting oversight committee, part of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.
Counter-narcotics contract spending increased by 32 percent over the five-year period from $482 million in 2005 to $635 million in 2009. Falls Church, Va., based DynCorp got the biggest piece of the wasted pie, a whopping $1.1 billion.
090311_mcCaskill_297.jpeg
Photo: Politico
Sen. Claire McCaskill: “We are wasting tax dollars and throwing money at a problem without even knowing what we are getting in return”
These contractors have plenty of ways to waste your tax money. They train local police and investigators in anti-drug methods, provide logistical support to intelligence collection centers, and fly airplanes and helicopters that spray herbicides to supposedly eradicate coca crops grown to produce cocaine.
The Department of Defense has wasted $6.1 billion of tax money since 2005 to help spot planes and boats headed north to the U.S. with drug payloads, as well as on surveillance and other intelligence operations.
Some of the expenses are “difficult to characterize,” according to Senate staff members, which is government-speak for “OK, you caught us wasting money again.” The Army wasted $75,000 for paintball supplies for “training exercises” in 2007, for example, and $5,000 for what the military listed as “rubber ducks.”
The “ducks” are rubber replicas of M-16 rifles that are used in training exercises, a Pentagon spokesman claimed.
Even the Defense Department described its own system for tracking these contracts as “error prone,” according to the Senate report, which also says the department doesn’t have reliable data about “how successful” its efforts have been. Go figure.
In a separate report last month by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, there is the conclusion that the State Department “does not have a centralized inventory of counter-narcotics contracts” and said the department does not evaluate the overall success of its counter-narcotics program.
“It’s become increasingly clear that our efforts to rein in the narcotics trade in Latin America, especially as it relates to the government’s use of contractors, have largely failed,” Sen. McCaskill said.
The latest criticism of the United States’ War On Drugs comes just a week after a high-profile group of world leaders called the global Drug War a costly failure.
The group, which included former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan and past presidents of Mexico, Brazil and Colombia, recommended that regional governments try legalizing and regulating drugs to help stop the flood of cash going to drug cartels and other organized crime groups.
James Gregory, a Pentagon spokesman, demonstrated his willingness to lie his ass off by claiming the Defense Department’s efforts against drugs “have been among the most successful and cost-effective programs” in decades.
“By any reasonable assessment, the U.S. has received ample strategic national security benefits in return for its investments in this area,” said Gregory, who seems to inhabit a particularly improbable alternate reality.
Back in the real world, the only effects most objective observers can see run along these lines: Backed by the United States, Mexico’s stepped-up Drug War has had the unintended effect of pushing drug cartels deeper into Central America, causing violence to soar in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.
Another effect has been the vast expansion of Orwellain surveillance technology, supposedly to combat drugs, but ever-so-useful to the authoritarian regimes in Central America (and in the United States) in suppressing dissent.
The U.S. is currently focusing on improving its efforts to intercept cellphone and Internet traffic (of “drug cartels,” yeah right) in the region, according to U.S. officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.
During a visit to El Salvador in February, William Brownfield, the head of the State Department’s anti-drug programs, opened a wiretapping center in San Salvador, as well as an office to share fingerprints and other data with U.S. law enforcement.

Jesus Healed the Sick with Nature’s Panacea (Marijuana)

Jesus Christ was a toker. No, this isn’t some attempt by this website to convert the more ecclesiastical internet surfers to toke up when they’re reading the bible. It’s grounded in the real-life readings of ancient religious texts. Read on to find out just how the Big JC and his followers used marijuana to help heal, and propagate the more mystical components of early Christianity.

According to the Guardian:

Jesus was almost certainly a cannabis user and an early proponent of the medicinal properties of the drug, according to a study of scriptural texts published this month.

The study suggests that Jesus and his disciples used the drug to carry out miraculous healings. The anointing oil used by Jesus and his disciples contained an ingredient called kaneh-bosem which has since been identified as cannabis extract, according to an article by Chris Bennett in the drugs magazine, High Times, entitled ‘Was Jesus a Stoner.’

Ohhhh. So it’s High Times that’s issuing this decree about Jesus using marijuana for it’s health benefits. But, not so fast with your dismissal.  High Times has always taken pains to avoid impropriety in their articles since it’s considered a fringe publication. So author Chris Bennett took pains to avoid biased research. Witness this proclamation from Carl Ruck, a professor of Classic Mythology at Boston University:

‘There can be little doubt about a role for cannabis in Judaic religion…Obviously the easy availability and long-established tradition of cannabis in early Judaism would inevitably have included it in the [Christian] mixtures.’

So what does this mean? Well Mr. Bennett ends with this conclusion:

If cannabis was one of the main ingredients of the ancient anointing oil and receiving this oil is what made Jesus the Christ and his followers Christians, then persecuting those who use cannabis could be considered anti-Christ.

It’s not a terrible stretch of the imagination to understand his summation. Jesus and his followers used marijuana and marijuana oil to help the sick , and also for their own inclusion in the early cloistered group that came to be Christianity. Jesus is considered God’s son, and marijuana was the bulwark against infirmity and pain for his followers. Thus, fighting against marijuana would pit you against Christ; hence, it’s Anti-Christ.

Now let’s try and make sure the more devout Christians, who believe marijuana is a tool of the devil, don’t decide to burn me in effigy

Support Marijuana Legalization And Get Ypur Name On A Virtual Brick

Legalize it!

Two weeks ago, we launched our new organization, the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform (CCPR), to bring citizens together to work toward legalizing marijuana in2012.

Already, thousands of people like you have stood up and pledged their support for going back to the ballot next year.

With that kind of support, I am confident that we can win. Together, we’re going to build this organization, brick by brick, and lay the foundation for an even stronger grassroots movement — but we need your help to do it.

That’s why, today, we are launching our Founding Members program. With a contribution of $25 or more, we’ll place your name on your own personalized virtual brick on our website’s Founders Wall, publicly recognizing you as a Founding Member of the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform.

Contribute $25 to our Founding Member drive today — and have a brick added in your name to our virtual wall!

Become a Founding Member of CCPR

To recognize friends like you, we’re building a virtual brick wall, symbolizing the support we have for cannabis policy reform.

Each brick represents a supporter of the cause, with his or her name engraved on the front, along with a personalized comment. Our virtual wall will let the world know everyone who is a part of this new effort from the very start.

Every contribution counts. If we build our virtual wall with just 1,000 bricks, we’ll have already raised $25,000 for our cause.

Will you buy your own personalized brick right now — so we can add your name to our Founding Member wall?

Show your support for building the grassroots movement that will tax and legalize cannabis in California: Contribute $25 and get your own personalized brick added to our Founding Member wall!

Your contribution to CCPR will help us build the movement we need to end cannabis prohibition in California. Together, we can lead the nation to a more sensible drug policy — brick by brick.

We are extremely grateful for your support.

Dale Jones
Chair
Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform

P.S. Want to check out how the Founding Member wall is already shaping up? Click here to check it out — and then click here to buy your own personalized virtual brick.

Tourist Fined $2,000 For 3 Grams Of Marijuana In Bermuda

DRUGS bermuda.jpg
Photo: Cruise Law News
Don’t carry your weed to Bermuda.

An American tourist who said she smoked marijuana for medical reasons was fined $2,000 on Thursday in Bermuda.

Teresa Sheridan, 53, or Oregon, pleaded guilty in Magistrates’ Court to one count of importing cannabis, reports Mikaela Ian Pearman of the Bermuda Sun.
Sheridan arrived on a flight from New York to Bermuda on May 23 at 2:10 p.m. She was selected for a search by Customs officers because a drug-detecting dog had alerted to her seat on the plane.
In the ensuing search, a Customs dog alerted on Sheridan’s groin area. When asked if she had any drugs, she said, “Yes, in between my legs.”
Officers searched her luggage and discovered a black container, a clear herb grinder with traces of plant material, rolling papers and a ceramic pipe made to look like a cigarette.
In a private search room, Sheridan removed a white sock from her groin area. The sock contained two plastic bags, one with coffee grounds and another with three grams of cannabis.
She was arrested on the spot for importing drugs into Bermuda.
Counsel Marc Daniels told the court that Sheridan used cannabis as a treatment for depression. “She uses weed to calm her nerves and should be dealt with by way of a fine,” Daniels said.
“The fact that she had it hidden between her legs would indicate she knew it was contraband,” remarked Senior Magistrate Archibald Warner. “She knew it was illegal.”
Warner fined Sheridan $2,000, to be paid immediately.
Just one day before, Edith Lord Wolffe, a tourist from California, was given 30 days in jail and a $3,000 fine for importing 35 grams of cannabis. The court heard that Wolffe’s physician had recommended cannabis for her chronic illness, Ménière’s disease.
Wolffe’s lawyer, Mark Pettingill, has launched an appeal and a bail application.
Bermuda is notoriously unfriendly to marijuana and tourists who possess it, although politicians there last year called for a debate on decriminalization.
%d bloggers like this: