Posts Tagged ‘marijuana news’

Teens May Be Charged For Pot Brownie Prank

A trio of teenagers in downstate Illinois are looking at a possible criminal record after police say they baked a batch of marijuana brownies and handed them out to unknowing victims.
The O’Fallow Township High School students were attending summer band camp where the incident allegedly took place. Besides facing criminal charges, the school may also take disciplinary action, according to STLtoday.com.
O’Fallon police Sgt. Rob Schmidtke told the site, “Anytime anybody is given drugs or something else without their knowledge that can obviously be a health hazard. We won’t let this slide. It could have been a very big deal.”
Police were tipped off via a fellow student who had learned about the prank and alerted a school administrator.
Schmidtke says the three teens confessed to lacing the brownies, adding, “It could have been an interesting band practice.”
O’Fallon Police Chief John Betten told the Belleville News Democrat, “No charges have been filed at this point and the case is still under investigation,” and that fortunately there were no “reports of problems” for any of the band members that ingested the pot-laced baked goods.
“Maybe [the teens] didn’t do a very good job of making them,” he added.

Man Arrested For Suspected Marijuana Laced Treats, Meant For “His Aunt”

Christopher Robert DuffyA Pennsylvania man was arrested during a traffic stop on I-85 after a deputy suspected dozens of rice crispy treats contained marijuana.

He told the arresting officer the treats were for his sick aunt.

Christopher Robert Duffy, 29, of Philadelphia is charged with possession with intent to distribute marijuana and possession with intent to distribute cocaine by the Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office.

Duffy was a passenger in a car that was stopped on Interstate 85 North at the 80 mile marker Monday night.

The deputy suspected Duffy and a woman driving the car had possession of drugs after they were stopped for making illegal lane changes. A K-9 checked the exterior of the car and reacted at the front door.

The deputy claims to have found 14 small bags of white powder – suspected to be cocaine – in the car along with cash. The deputy says he also found 29 rice crispy treats that smelled of marijuana in the trunk.

Duffy told the officer “the marijuana rice crispy treats were for his sick aunt and that he purchased them at a concert in Atlanta” according to the incident report.

Duffy was arrested, but the driver of the car was allowed to leave. Duffy is being held at the Spartanburg County Detention Center on $10,000 bond.

http://www2.wspa.com/news/2011/aug/02/man-arrested-suspected-marijuana-laced-treats-mean-ar-2219794/ 

Ohio Could Be The Next Medical Marijuana State

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ohio marijuana

by Phillip Smith

Ohio could be a major medical marijuana battleground next year, as two different initiative efforts aimed at the November 2012 ballot are getting underway and a bill is pending in the state legislature. If Ohio climbs on the medical marijuana bandwagon, it would be the second Midwest state to do so, after Michigan, which approved it via the initiative route in 2008.

Two different initiative efforts are underway in Ohio, and there’s pending legislation, too. (image via Wikimedia)

A medical marijuana bill, House Bill 214, was introduced in April and has been assigned to the Committee on Health and Aging, but given that a decade’s worth of efforts to get a medical marijuana bill out of the legislature have yet to bear fruit, patients and advocates are moving forward with efforts to put the matter directly before the voters.

One initiative, the Ohio Alternative Treatment Amendment(OATA), was submitted to state officials Wednesday with more than twice the 1,000 signatures needed for the Attorney General to take the next step, approving the measure’s summary language. That will take place in 10 days.

Organizers are already setting their sights on gathering the 385,000 thousand valid voter signatures needed to qualify for the 2012 ballot. They have until May to turn them in.

The Ohio Medical Cannabis Act of 2012The OATA would modify the state constitution to allow doctors in a bona fide relationship with patients to recommend medical marijuana and offers protections to patients, caregivers, and physicians alike. Patients or caregivers could grow up to 12 plants and possess up to 200 grams of processed marijuana. Multiple caregivers could store their product in a “safe access center,” and growers would be allowed to receive some compensation.

The second initiative getting underway, the Ohio Medical Cannabis Act of 2012 (OMCA) would modify the state constitution to establish government agencies to regulate medical marijuana “in a manner similar to the system that has successfully overseen vineyards and adult beverages,” according to OMCA press release. The campaign has yet to turn in the initial 1,000 signatures and win approval of its summary language, but has delayed because although it has already gathered more than 2,500, it is making final changes in the initiative’s language, said campaign spokesperson Theresa Daniello.

“Over the past few days, we’ve spent hours and hours Skype conferencing and going over the language,” said Daniello. “There were things like if the police came in with a warrant, we want to make sure they check with the medical marijuana enforcement division to make sure no one in that house is a patient.”

Getting it right was worth the delay, the Cleveland patient and mother of five said. “We’re not in a huge rush.” Organizers would probably hand in the signatures in a week or two, she added.

The OMCA would apply already familiar regulations, such as licensing, local option laws, and HIPAA patient privacy rules to medical marijuana.  It would create an Ohio Commission of Medical Cannabis Control, which, like its counterparts in liquor control, would be charged with enforcing regulations and preventing diversion.

“The state of Ohio has a 77-year-old proven regulatory system under our liquor control laws that is one of the most effectively run in the country,” said Daniello. “There are only 470 liquor stores in the state, one per county, and one more for each additional 30,000 residents, and counties can opt out, like dry counties do for alcohol. It would be like that. It’s our goal that no patients be arrested,” she added. “We want it out of the hands of the police and handed over to the division. We don’t need guns, we need people who are educated.”

Under the OMCA, patients with qualifying medical conditions who get a physician’s recommendation would be able to possess up to 200 grams of medical marijuana and up to 12 mature and 12 immature plants. Patients would be registered with the state and provided with ID cards. Patients would be able to designate caregivers to grow for them.

“Both models are good,” said medical marijuana patient and activist Tonya Davis. “Ohio patients want a safer alternative. The models are different, but we figure that between the bill at the legislature, and the two initiatives submitting language, we can come up with something that serves patients.”

marijuana medicine“We’re trying to work together to keep the energy going the right way,” said Daniello.

That would be great for patients like Chad Holmes, who underwent chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery for colon cancer, resulting in the removal of much of his digestive tract. He used medical marijuana to counter the side effects of nausea and severe pain, and found it to be the only medicine that allowed him to eat, maintain his strength, and function.

“Medical marijuana didn’t cure me, but it allowed me to survive the cure long enough for it to work,” he said. He has now been cancer free for over six years.

“Ohioans like Mr. Holmes face a terrible choice,” said Daniello. “They can choose to suffer with the horrible, debilitating effects of their illness, or risk arrest and years in prison for using medical marijuana to relieve their pain and suffering.”

But if either the legislature or the voters act, that dilemma for medical marijuana patients will be resolved. Look for a lot of action on medical marijuana in the Buckeye State in the next few months.

Money will be key. Peter Lewis, founder of Cleveland-based Progressive Insurance and a significant drug reform funder, issued a request for proposals for action on medical marijuana in May, but neither group appears to have offered one. Day said she thought Lewis had turned his attention elsewhere, while Daniello said her campaign would likely contact him later.

“We’re accepting support,” Daniello said. “We had less than a week to respond to Peter Lewis’s call for a request for proposals, and we decided that wasn’t enough time. We need to show that we can act in a professional manner before we go back.”

National presidential election year politics could help stir major funder interest, Daniello suggested. “2012 is a presidential year, and, as they say, as goes Ohio, so goes the nation,” she said. “If the proper people realize that, the funding will come in.”

It will have to for either of these initiatives to have a serious chance of making it to the ballot.

Artilcle From StoptheDrugWar.org – Creative Commons Licensing

detecting marijuana in fingerprints

By Steve Elliott ~alapoet~ in News
Tuesday, July 26, 2011, at 1:20 pm
Share30
police-fingerprint-handcuffs3.jpeg
Photo: CBS Detroit

​A new technology that analyzes the sweat from your fingertips could revolutionize the drug-testing market, purportedly providing onsite results in minutes with a test so sensitive it can even detect marijuana intoxication.

The test, produced by the British company Intelligent Fingerprinting, uses gold nanoparticles and “special antibodies” to latch onto metabolites in the fingerprint, reports Stephen C. Webster at The Raw Story. It turns a specific color depending on which drug byproducts are detected.
While it can be configured to search for drugs like nicotine, methadone and cocaine, what may turn out to be its most important innovation is its purported ability to help determine if someone is actively intoxicated on cannabis.

Why is this so important? Because a number of states have either passed or are considering laws against driving under the influence of marijuana, even though accurate tests of intoxication haven’t been generally available.
Marijuana’s main psychoactive ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), is fat soluble, so it stays in the body for weeks. I personally believe this is because your body loves cannabinoids and holds onto them as long as it can.
But the downside of this is that it means traditional drug testing using urine analysis or hair tests can detect whether a person has used marijuana for up to six weeks afterwards — but it doesn’t reveal if the person is high on pot at the time the test was taken.
The fingerprint test, on the other hand (the IntelliPrint™ cannabis assay), can purportedly detect minuscule amounts of drug metabolites in minutes, theoretically revealing whether that person is high or not. The development could lead to a breakthrough resulting in more accurate testing to determine whether a person is driving while high.
“Intelligent Fingerprinting has the potential to deliver the most exciting breakthrough in detecting illicit drug misuse for over a decade and it comes with identify of each individual included,” said Dr. Jerry Walker, CEO of Intelligent Fingerprinting.
The device was first announced last week, during the UCL International Crime Science Conference.

Great-Grandmother, 74, Arrested For Selling Marijuana

A great-grandmother in Sydney, Australia, has been arrested by police as a drug dealer.

Noelene Edwards, 74, said she’s just a grieving widow, struggling with the recent loss of her husband, reports Clementine Cuneo at The Daily Telegraph.
The Surry Hills woman said she had been on her way into the city to pay for her husband’s funeral on Tuesday when a police dog allegedly detected that she was carrying cannabis.
Police claim a search of Mrs. Edwards’ handbag turned up 40 bags containing marijuana. (No word on how much pot was in each of the “40 bags.”)

animal testing

Marijuana Pill BottleThe long-term administration of delta-9-THC, the primary psychoactive compound in marijuana, is associated with decreased mortality in monkeys infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a primate model of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) disease, according to in vivo experimental trial data published in the June issue of the journal AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

Investigators at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center assessed the impact of chronic intramuscular THC administration compared to placebo on immune and metabolic indicators of SIV disease during the initial six-month phase of infection.

Researchers reported, “Contrary to what we expected, … delta-9-THC treatment clearly did not increase disease progression, and indeed resulted in generalized attenuation of classic markers of SIV disease.” Authors also reported that THC administration was associated with “decreased early mortality from SIV infection” and “retention of body mass.”

marijuana medicineInvestigators concluded, “These results indicate that chronic delta-9-THC does not increase viral load or aggravate morbidity and may actually ameliorate SIV disease progression.”

Clinical trials have previously documented that the short-term inhalation of cannabis does not adversely impact viral loads in HIV patients, and may even improve immune function.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Cannabinoid administration attenuates the progression of simian immunodeficiency virus,” is available online here:http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/aid.2010.0218. Additional studies documenting the disease modifying potential of marijuana is available in the NORML handbook, Emerging Clinical Applications For Cannabis & Cannabinoids: Fourth Edition, available online at: http://norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=7002.

From Norml.org

Jail Guard Tries To Smuggle Herb To Inmate

Image via link.

What’s good homies, this story is coming from the Cook County Jail in Illinois. April 23, 2010,  32 year old Heriberto Viramontes attacked two women as they were walking home on a Bucktown sidewalk on the 1800 block of North Damen. Now on June 11th of this year, his girlfriend was arrested minutes after leaving the jail after leaving some bud taped under the table in the visitor’s room! If that wasn’t enough stupidity by one person, more people were allegedly involved, including 50 year old Jerom Prusa, the guard who allowed this all to happen. For the full story click here.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Prusia was suspended pending an employment hearing and he resigned from the LaGrange Park Police Department, where he worked as an auxiliary officer. Prusa faces a slew of charges, especially after officers also found two knives in his uniform. Both Viramontes and Lundgren were charged with one count each of bringing contraband into a penal institution.

Alright, I usually believe everyone should enjoy herb no matter what. But this guy is pretty much undeserving of the good, let alone life for the things he did. These fools are stupid and all need to rethink they’re shit. Be about that paper, not jail.

http://www.hailmaryjane.com

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