Posts Tagged ‘pictures of weed’

Video of the Day: Wiz Khalifa – Reefer Party

 

Are you kidding me? Look at that joint/blunt/cigar. Holy sh!t.

Support Marijuana Legalization And Get Ypur Name On A Virtual Brick

Legalize it!

Two weeks ago, we launched our new organization, the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform (CCPR), to bring citizens together to work toward legalizing marijuana in2012.

Already, thousands of people like you have stood up and pledged their support for going back to the ballot next year.

With that kind of support, I am confident that we can win. Together, we’re going to build this organization, brick by brick, and lay the foundation for an even stronger grassroots movement — but we need your help to do it.

That’s why, today, we are launching our Founding Members program. With a contribution of $25 or more, we’ll place your name on your own personalized virtual brick on our website’s Founders Wall, publicly recognizing you as a Founding Member of the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform.

Contribute $25 to our Founding Member drive today — and have a brick added in your name to our virtual wall!

Become a Founding Member of CCPR

To recognize friends like you, we’re building a virtual brick wall, symbolizing the support we have for cannabis policy reform.

Each brick represents a supporter of the cause, with his or her name engraved on the front, along with a personalized comment. Our virtual wall will let the world know everyone who is a part of this new effort from the very start.

Every contribution counts. If we build our virtual wall with just 1,000 bricks, we’ll have already raised $25,000 for our cause.

Will you buy your own personalized brick right now — so we can add your name to our Founding Member wall?

Show your support for building the grassroots movement that will tax and legalize cannabis in California: Contribute $25 and get your own personalized brick added to our Founding Member wall!

Your contribution to CCPR will help us build the movement we need to end cannabis prohibition in California. Together, we can lead the nation to a more sensible drug policy — brick by brick.

We are extremely grateful for your support.

Dale Jones
Chair
Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform

P.S. Want to check out how the Founding Member wall is already shaping up? Click here to check it out — and then click here to buy your own personalized virtual brick.

Drug Warriors Won’t Play Cannabis Reformers In Softball

PICT0181.jpeg
Photo: Anastacia Cosner
The One Hitters are already kicking the Drug War’s ass — now they want to beat the drug warriors in a softball game

Once again, the softball team representing the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) has backed out of playing a softball game against the One Hitters, a team consisting of members of several drug policy reform organizations and others who want to end the “War On Drugs.”

A game between the two teams had been scheduled for May 25, but the ONDCP Czardinals chickened out shortly after scheduling the game, with ONDCP public liaison coordinator Quinn Staudt claiming an “accidental double-booking.”
This is not the first time the Czardinals have refused to play the One Hitters.
OneHittersWashingtonPost08.05.07.jpeg
Photo: Anastacia Cosner
The One Hitters dominate the Congressional Softball League
​ In six years, the team of drug warriors has managed to find one lame reason or another to avoid taking the field against the One Hitters, made up of individuals dedicated to reforming the out-of-date and ineffectual policies promoted by the ONDCP.
This behavior is being mimicked on the national stage by the ONDCP as well, according to the reformers.
While Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske claimed he would no longer use the rhetoric of a “War On Drugs” and President Obama said he wants to treat drug abuse more as a health problem than a criminal justice issue, little has been seen in the way of action in that direction.
The President has also said he does not support the legalization of any drug — even marijuana — despite the inarguable damage marijuana prohibition does to society, individual users, medical patients that benefit from cannabis treatments, governmental budgets, and respect for the rule of law.
“It is really disappointing that the ONDCP not only refuses to have an honest debate with drug policy reformers about the absolute failure of drug prohibition, but also keeps ducking out of softball games with us,” said One Hitters team captain Jacob Berg.
“We think it would be a great opportunity to advance the discussion between drug law reformers and the people ostensibly in charge of drug policy in this country,” Berg said. “I wonder if they are afraid to have that conversation.”
“The drug czar said ‘legalization’ isn’t in his vocabulary, but it’s just a friendly softball game!” Berg said.
The One Hitters still hope that Czardinals will put aside ideological differences and accept their invitation to play a softball game this summer on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
TheOneHittersSummerSoftballTeamPhotos0608 sized.jpg
Photo: Anastacia Cosner
The mighty One Hitters strike fear into the hearts of the ONDCP Czardinals and drug warriors everywhere.

Stoner Photo: Hotbox Helmet

Who has tried this with marijuana? It is just like a gas mask. Every time I have tried it, it usually takes about three or four inhales/exhales to clear out the helmet. It’s always fun to try when your smoking some with friends. It always seems to give someone a over powering buzz and knocks them out.

Stoner Photo of the Day: Hot Girl Rolling/Smoking Blunt

Come by Cafe Vale Tudo
24601 Raymond Way, Suite 9B
Lake Forest, CA 92630
(949) 454-9227
Open 10 am to 10 pm every day!

Wisdom Wednesdays: Curing Bud

What’s good Greenies and welcome to another insightful Wisdom Wednesday from me, ThisBuds4You. This week we’re going to check out an often left out but CRUCIAL and CRITICAL final step of growing and producing high-grade bud, curing. Curing is important because it allows us to receive cannabis buds at their greatest potential. Curing increases the potency of cannabis, creates a much smoother smoke and it also greatly improves the taste of the buds. Curing is done once harvested cannabis buds have finished drying; typically after 5-7 days drying time. Once the buds have been dried they are placed in glass mason jars with sealable lids. Once the buds are placed in jars the remaining moisture gets evenly distributed throughout the bud. This re-moistens the buds and the jars need to be “burped” or opened to allow some air exchange and then re-sealed. This action should be performed 2-3 times a day for the first week, then once a day the second week. Doing this over time will dry the cannabis buds out slow, creating a nice and smooth smoke. The cannabis buds should be ready for smoking at the end of the second week cure. Check out the video for more info on curing below.

Keep it green Greenies and OVERGROW THE WORLD!!!

Stoner Photo of the Day: When Your Parents Find Out You Smoke

That sucks. Maybe she just wanted to know where you buy your marijuana? Haha.

Stoner Weapon of Choice: A Guide To Smoking Paraphernalia

Every pot smoker comes with a different set of preferences: Where they smoke, what kind of weed they like, what they watch/listen to while smoking, and most importantly: how they consume the magical herb. Stoners, take up your weapon of choice!

Blunt

In this day and age, the blunt may very well be the most preferred way to smoke weed. Why? There are numerous reasons: It lasts longer than a joint, is more convenient for mobility than a bong or bowl, and gets you super stoned, super fast. It’s also great comic relief when you try to explain to anyone over the age of 30. The blunt didn’t become popular until fairly recently, so any potheads left over from previous generations have no idea that you can crack open a cigar and fill it up with weed.

Now, there are infinite methods to rolling a blunt. Everyone has their own strategy: Some prefer the long “pencil” that can extend the blunt’s life but can be too tight to hit if rolled incorrectly. Some enjoy the “doody stick,” an ugly monstrosity that burns quickly, hits harshly, and leaves you with large pieces of nug in your throat. And still others prefer the epic and genius “cone” (my personal favorite) which balances the positives of both of the previous blunt types, without many of the negatives.

But customization doesn’t end there: Many different types of cigars can be used: Dutchmasters, Games, Phillies, White Owls, and Swisher Sweets, among many others. The downside to any blunt is that it’s the stinkiest way to smoke, as well as one of the least efficient ways…Not to mention totally unhealthy – You aren’t supposed to be inhaling cigar paper that way.

Joint

joint

The joint is the geriatric cousin of the blunt: Smaller, weaker, and less impressive in every way. In fact, the only real pros to the joint are 1. lack of tobacco (unless you’re rolling a spliff, which negates that pro) and 2. higher stealth factor than its big, brown relative. If you’re trying to go to a concert or some other place where you get searched on the way in, you have a higher chance of getting in with several well-concealed joints than with one large blunt. They can be rolled in similar ways to blunts,  with papers of various different brands, sizes, flavors, and materials.

So what’s so bad about the joint? For one, the smell of burning paper is far more irritating to me than burning tobacco (personally). It also happens to be the LEAST efficient way to blaze, burning your herb at an incredibly high temperature and speed.

Chillum/Bat

chillum

If stealth is what you’re going for, then this may be for you. These pieces are super easy to smuggle into venues, and fairly discreet to smoke in crowds. You can buy a metal or wood one-hitter with a dugout, or invest in a artistic glass chillum that packs a little more but is bulkier and more fragile.

Although there’s a certain amount of convenience to this method, it’s also my least favorite way of burning. There are numerous reasons why: 1. You can’t see what your lighting, 2. There is no carb to clear the chamber of the piece, 3. Some of the time you have to tilt your head up to take a hit in an attempt to not lose your bowl packing, and 4. Way too many burning embers (otherwise known as scooby snacks) jetting down the back of your throat at breakneck speeds.

Bowl/Pipe

bowl

The bowl is the bat’s big brother, and the second of four glass siblings. Although you can buy metal, wood, or corncob pipes, most weed connoisseurs prefer glass over anything else.

Bowls come in sorts of shapes, sizes, and colors. You could say that it’s the most artistic of the brothers, most of the time doubling as a beautiful conversation piece. You can buy a bowl that is shaped like an animal, or one that changes colors as you smoke it more and more, or one with a unique shape or pattern. You might even give it a name because it’s a work of art – and every piece of art needs a title. I prefer to give my pieces really meaningful names: Corrinado (named after a character from a Disco Biscuits rock opera), The Seussaphone (it resembles an instrument out of a Dr. Seuss book), and Keanu Reeves (long story as to how this one got its name, I’ll go into it some other time).

Bubbler

bubbler

The bubbler is a hybrid that combines the convenient size of the bowl with the science of the bong. You get to keep the basic structure of its little brother, but with the added element of water filtration. Diffusion not only keeps you from getting ash in your mouth (gross), but also maximizes the THC you take in while minimizing miscellaneous chemicals and substances that come with burning plant matter. The more times the smoke filters through water, the more concentrated the THC content becomes and the smoother the hit becomes.

The negative impact: There are none. The bubbler is really the perfect smoking device – That’s why I personally own a double bubbler named Littlefoot (if you couldn’t guess, it resembles the young Brontosaurus from The Land Before Time), as well as a traditional bubbler swirled with the colors of the rainbow, hence its name Roy G. Biv.

Bong

Illadelph_Tri_Coil

If you can afford it, the bong is the way to go. Like bubblers, bowls, and chillums before it, the bong comes in all kinds of shapes, sizes, colors, and materials. They have massive ranges in price: a rubber-stopper mini-bong can cost $20, and a top-shelf name brand glass-on-glass bong with percolators (the more percs, the more filtration/diffusion) and a frozen coil chamber can potentially run you thousands of dollars.

The bong would be considered the scientist of the four brothers – and that’s what you’re paying for: Machine-cut glass and wonderful technology make it the BEST way to puff by far. Bongs are the most efficient and conservative way to smoke (notice I say SMOKE, you’ll see why soon).

The downside of the bong? There are two: 1. The most easily broken of the glass pieces – being both tall and skinny means a high center of gravity and the significant chance of a friend’s leg making direct contact, and 2. They can be quite large and heavy, making them inconvenient as a group smoking device. If you go this route for today, I recommend you stick to personal bong use only, or at the very most three people.

MacGyver Piece

water-bottle-bong

And so we come to the disowned, retarded bastard of the pieces. We’ve all undoubtedly had to whip together a quick bong or bowl at some point in our years smoking cheeba. Half Baked promoted the use of “an avocado, an icepick, and my snorkel” but there are much easier materials around your house with which to make a bong.

When I was a young lad of 14, my friends and I would make bongs by inserting a hollowed out pen in a hole we burned in the side of a soda bottle, and then shaping tin foil into a cone over the pen. Looking back, it was totally unhealthy in every way, but it was cheaper than buying glass.

You can also use soda bottles in conjunction with large pretzel containers and ratchet heads to make a gravity bong or waterfall bong (look them up), which get you stupid high and make you cough until you’re purple in the face.  There’s also the apple bowl, which is even simpler to construct. All it takes is an apple and something to jab into it to create the bowl, the carb, and the mouthpiece.

If you’re extremely desperate you can always come back to these hoodrat smoking methods, but I haven’t run into a situation that calls for them in years.

Vaporizer

VOLCANO

Oh the wonders of the vaporizer! It is a far departure from any previously mentioned smoking method in that you aren’t really smoking at all. Vapes use a heating element to bring your nugs right to the point where the water molecules on them evaporate and turn into a milky steam. Attached to that gas is the highest amount of THC that you can get. It is THE most efficient way to consume THC (though is NOT classified as smoking, technically), as well as the healthiest.

Not only does it not take a toll on your lungs, but it actually has been known to clear up congestion, as THC is a natural expectorant. Notice how you cough when you smoke weed, but not when you smoke cigarettes? There’s a reason for that. You’ll cough even harder when you get a really good, slow, and steady hit from a vaporizer – It’ll clear you right up.

There are many different kinds of vapes, and technological advance is bringing about new ones every day, but only a couple are really famous: The Volcano is both an expensive and complicated piece of machinery, which allows for incredibly accurate vaporization, but puffing out of a bag is kind of weird. “Pencil Sharpeners” are aptly named for their striking resemblance to pencil sharpeners, and are far simpler and cheaper than the former, with the other plus being that pulling on a hose feels more like a hookah, and thus closer to the act of actual smoking.

Many people claim that vaporizers don’t do it for them because they really just enjoy the act of smoking. Smoking is just as much of a social act as it is inhaling a drug, so anyone who says that is not without reason. But when you’re feeling bored and lonely, the vape is the perfect device to whip out for a bowl to the face.

Edibles

hemp-beach-tv-stoner-brownies-weed-pot

Like the vaporizer, edible THC is in a category all its own. It also has few to no negative effects – well, besides getting way, way too high. The best part is that you can basically cook it into anything. The first step is melting down the weed in either butter or oil, and then filtering out the nasty wet leaves, leaving behind a nice dark liquid. Then go to town.

You could be a traditionalist and stick to baked goods like brownies, cakes, and cookies, or you could get creative with it. You can make rice crispy treats or milkshakes, or you can put it in sauce and then toss it with pasta. Throw that butter back in the fridge and let it solidify, then spread it over toast. You can seriously find ways to get it into any food or snack.

And if you do it right, it will get you baked out of your skull for many, many long hours. It’s almost as if it’s your first time getting high all over again. Sometimes you can get high almost to the point of hallucination and delusion: You get all introspective, then you have a small panic attack, and in the end you fix everything by forcing yourself to sleep until you’re no longer stoned. It works, I’ve done it once before.

http://www.thecampussocialite.com/stoner-weapon-of-choice-a-guide-to-smoking-paraphernalia/?utm_source=scribol&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=scribol

13 Strangest Ways People Get High

Marijuana Advocates Sue Government Over Rescheduling Delay

Screen shot 2011-05-23 at 12.37.50 PM.png
Photo: MyMedicineTheBook.com
The federal government refuses to reclassify marijuana as medicine — despite the fact that it has sent Irv Rosenfeld and a handful of other patients hundreds of joints a month for close to 30 years.

A coalition of medical marijuana advocacy groups and patients filed suit Monday in D.C. Circuit Court to compel the Obama Administration to answer a nine-year-old petition to reclassify medical marijuana.

The Coalition for Rescheduling Cannabis (CRC) has never received an answer to its 2002 petition, despite a formal recommendation in 2006 from the Department of Health and Human Services to the Drug Enforcement Administration, which is unfortunately the final arbiter in the rescheduling process.
As recently as July 2010, the DEA issued a 54-page “Position on Marijuana,” but failed to even mention the pending CRC petition.
Plaintiffs in the case include the CRC, Americans for Safe Access (ASA), Patients Out of Time, as well as individually named patients, one of whom is listed on the CRC petition but died in 2005.

“The federal government’s strategy has been delay, delay, delay,” said Joe Elford, chief counsel of ASA and lead counsel on the writ. “It is far past time for the government to answer our rescheduling petition, but unfortunately we’ve been forced to go to court in order to get resolution.”
joe_elford.jpg.jpeg
Photo: ASA
Joe Elford, ASA: “The federal government’s strategy has been delay, delay, delay. It is far past time for the government to answer our rescheduling petition”
​The writ of mandamus filed on Monday accuses the government of unreasonable delay in violation of the Administrative Procedures Act. A previous cannabis (marijuana) rescheduling petition filed in 1972 were unanswered for 22 years before being denied.
The writ argues that cannabis is not a dangerous drug and that ample evidence of its therapeutic value based on scientific studies in the United States and around the world.
“Despite numerous peer-reviewed scientific studies establishing the marijuana is effective” in treating numerous medical conditions, the government “continues to deprive seriously ill persons of this needed, and often life-saving therapy by maintaining marijuana as a Schedcule I substance,” according to the writ.
The writ calls out the government for unlawfully failing to answer the petition despite an Inter-Agency Advisory issued by the Food and Drug Administration in 2006 and “almost five years after receiving a 41-page memorandum from HHS stating its scientific evaluation and recommendations.”
The federal government maintains its Schedule I classification of marijuana even as it gives out hundreds of federal joints every month to a handful of patients — which it has done since 1976, when it created the Investigational New Drug Compassionate Access Program.
Every month, the federal government still sends tins of 300 joints each to the four surviving patients of the original program, which suspended accepting new patients after President George H.W. Bush realized in the early 1990s that a wave of HIV/AIDS patients was on the way.
steph sherer.jpg
Photo: ASA
Steph Sherer, ASA: “Adhering to an outdated public policy that ignores science has created a war zone for doctors and their patients who are seeking to use cannabis therapeutics”
​ The two largest physician groups in the country — the American Medical Association and the American College of Physicians — have both called on the federal government to review marijuana’s status as a Schedule I substance with “no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.”
The National Cancer Institute, a part of the National Institutes for Health, added cannabis to its website earlier this year as a Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM) and recognized that “Cannabis has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years prior to its current status as an illegal substance.”
Medical marijuana has now been legalized in 16 states and the District of Columbia, and has an overwhelming 80 percent approval rating among Americans, according to several polls.
In an 1988 ruling on a prior rescheduling petition, the DEA’s own Administrative Law Judge Francis Young recommended in favor of reclassification, saying “Marijuana, in its natural form, is one of the safest therapeutically active substances known to man.”
A formal rejection of the CRC petition would enable the group to challenge in court the government’s assertion that marijuana has no medical value.
“Adhering to outdated public policy that ignores science has created a war zone for doctors and their patients who are seeking to use cannabis therapeutics,” said Steph Sherer, executive director of ASA and a plaintiff in the writ.
“The Obama Administration’s refusal to act on this petition is an irresponsible stalling tactic,” added Jon Gettman, who filed the rescheduling petition on behalf of the CRC.
A synthetic form of THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in the cannabis plant, is currently classified as a Schedule III substance for its use in a prescribed pill trademarked as Marinol®. The pill goes off-patent this year and companies vying to sell generic versions are petitioning the government to also reclassify the more economical, naturally derived THC (from the plant itself) to Schedule III as well.
The rescheduling process involves federal agencies such as the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), HHS, and DEA. On average, it takes six months from HHS review to final action, but it’s been almost five years since HHS issued its recommendation on the CRC petition — more than twice as long as any other rescheduling petition reviewed since 2002.
More Information
%d bloggers like this: